Overcoming the Extreme Physician Shortage in 2019

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For several years now, healthcare industry thought leaders have been telling us that there was a looming physician shortage on the horizon.  Initially, it was reported that primary care was going to be the hardest hit because of an aging baby boomer population, an influx of newly covered patients through the Affordable Care Act, and the fact that over 30% of active physicians will be 65 or older by the year 2030. The initial primary and urgent care perspective still rings true. However, the physician shortage is actually impacting specialties across the spectrum of care.

According to Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) research data, the primary care shortage can be as many as 43,100 by the year 2030, while non-primary care specialties may experience a shortfall of up to 61,000 physicians.  Within those numbers, certain specialties, such as emergency medicine, neurology, psychiatry, anesthesiology, and others may experience a shortage of between 18,600 and 31,800 by the year 2030.

As concerning as the data is currently, it may actually get worse before it gets better. There is a large segment of our population that remains underserved.  According to AAMC data, as barriers to utilization are lifted through health law changes, more non-insured Americans are accessing health care.  Studies show that if all Americans accessed health care at the same levels as those who have typical employer-sponsored health care, we would need close to 100,000 additional physicians to provide their care.

There are no easy solutions to resolve the physician shortage crisis, but here are a few things worth keeping an eye on throughout the rest of 2019.

Increase residency programs.  Medical schools have taken steps to increase class sizes, yet the federal bureaucracy hasn’t increased support for residency programs commensurately.  The AAMC is calling on lawmakers to increase residency slots by an additional 3,000 annually for five years to support an increase in practicing physicians.

Streamline licensing process for international medical school graduates.  Did you know that almost 25% of today’s physician workforce are international medical graduates? Studies show that while these international graduates provide care on par or better than U.S. trained doctors, they face a cumbersome and complex licensure process to practice here. Further, they are required to complete redundant training programs here in the U.S. before licensure. At the risk of oversimplification, lawmakers and healthcare industry leaders should be able to resolve this by promoting legislation that simplifies the process.

Rising salaries and creative compensation.  Since 2013, salaries for Primary Care physicians have risen 10%, and in many cases more based on geographic location.  Because competition for physician services is so fierce, healthcare organizations are finding new and creative ways to entice candidates to their vacancies.  Signing bonuses and tuition repayment is one way that physicians are making more money, but other enticements include flexible scheduling, reduction or elimination of “call,” and much more.  Facilities in rural and underserved areas are feeling the recruitment crunch because the enticements they used to be able to offer exclusively, are now becoming commonplace.

Balancing non-physician utilization and technology.  Most organizations have focused their physician shortage efforts on developing a greater reliance on non-physicians.  Nurse practitioners, physician assistants and locum tenens are all being used in greater numbers to fill workforce vacancies. Additionally, technologic innovations can also serve to increase access to care and increase the efficiency of monitoring and managing a chronic condition. Mobile health technology and the utilization of biometric sensors are increasingly more popular among individuals who are interested in being more involved in their healthcare.

Jackson Physician Search can help your organization address both short- and long-term physician shortage strategies.  Our recruitment professionals have decades of industry experience, and our thought leadership can provide you with proven strategies to improve your physician recruitment and retention programs.  Contact us today to learn more.

Benchmarking Your Recruitment Tactics

Benchmarking to Improve Your Recruitment Process

This is the second in an ongoing series summarizing the findings in a recent white paper published by the President of Jackson Physician Search, Tony Stajduhar. To read “Physician Recruitment: The…

Create a Cultural Blueprint for Successful Physician Recruitment

How to Create a Cultural Blueprint for Successful Physician Recruitment

Culture is defined as “values, beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors that employees share and exhibit on a daily basis in their work and in the community”. And, lack of cultural fit is among the top…

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What to Do About the Biggest Physician Recruitment Issues Affecting FQHC’s in 2019

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As physician recruitment becomes even more competitive each year, Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHC) are feeling the brunt of the challenges. Jackson Physician Search, in partnership with CommonWealth Purchasing Group, recently published a white paper on the Issues Affecting FQHC’s.  Here is a brief synopsis of the major talking points.

Shrinking Candidate Pool

The National Association of Community Health Centers is reporting that at least 95% of all health centers are reporting a clinical vacancy, with 70% of those being a physician opening.  Because CHC’s are expected to be managing the care of more than 35 million patients by 2020, not having candidates to fill vacancies is going to be impacting communities across the United States.  As you might expect, primary care is the hardest hit regarding vacancies, but keep in mind that CHC’s are providing a broader range of services than traditional primary care. Reports show that less than 6% of medical students plan to practice Family Medicine and 2% are pursuing internal medicine.

Compensation Models Have Changed

In years past, CHC’s would promote “non-monetary” benefits to practicing in a CHC. Things like a better schedule and quality of work/life balance, all used to be part of the draw to a small health center. Those advantages are no longer exclusive to CHC’s and rural practice settings.  Now, hospitals of all sizes are using every means available to attract qualified candidates in this highly competitive recruitment environment.  Salaries and sign-on bonuses are rising, loan forgiveness is being offered, and FQHC’s are having a difficult time keeping pace.

Four Things that FQHC’s Can Do to Recruit and Retain Staff

  1. Develop a Brand Strategy and Recruitment Marketing Plan – Less than 25% of FQHC’s have a fully implemented marketing plan. Physicians today are more interested in things like organizational culture and work environment than in years past. This is an area that a smaller health center can excel at if the time and attention is paid to developing a winning brand that highlights culture, values, and work/life balance.
  2. Develop Local and Regional Outreach Campaigns – FQHC’s can compete through the development of training partnerships with local or regional academic institutions. Attracting and retaining local talent can be accomplished with a solid brand strategy, promoting training partnerships, shadowing and mentor programs and other similar community relationships that draw candidates into a facility.
  3. Create a Comprehensive Retention Program – Recruiting a physician is only one-half of the battle. Having to replace a physician can take as long as 24 months and cost more than $500,000. By developing internal systems that monitor physician and staff satisfaction and continually cultivate a positive workplace culture, health centers can proactively achieve better retention. Also, by focusing on the type of employee that embodies their culture, they are prone to attract and hire individuals who fit that culture.
  4. Review Your Compensation Model and Delivery Team – Health centers are no longer able to get physicians “at a discount.” Salaries are much more competitive today across all practice settings, so CHC’s are being forced to be more creative. Implementing productivity metrics is one way to improve a physician’s base salary. CHC’s are also more commonly offering 3- or 4-day work weeks as a quality of life benefit.  This trend coincides with the utilization of more nurse practitioners and physician assistants to supplement the staff.

There is no simple answer to how FQHC’s can compete in the ultra-competitive physician recruitment and retention environment.  What is required is a fully developed strategy that incorporates many or all of the elements identified.  As Community Health Centers continue to play an integral role in the healthcare industry and more importantly in helping the patients and communities where they are located, it is critical that we as an industry support their needs.

If you are looking for a partner with the resources, experience, and nationwide reach to help solve your critical recruitment and retention challenges, contact Jackson Physician Search and find out how we can help today.

 

Jackson Physician Search Issues Affecting FQHCs White Paper

[White Paper] Issues Affecting FQHCs: What will it take for Federally Qualified Health Centers to survive in today’s healthcare physician recruiting climate?

Physician vacancies are affecting the majority of health centers across the country. This paper examines some of the recruitment and retention challenges that Federally Qualified Health Centers are…

Physician Hiring Outlook

2019 Outlook for Hiring Physicians

For several years, reports of the ongoing physician shortage have dominated the headlines.  To give healthcare leaders the comprehensive information they need to invest and adjust…

Need Help Recruiting Physicians?

Click the Get Started button if you’re ready to speak with one of our physician recruitment experts.

Is it Time to Reconsider the Benefits of Private Practice?

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In recent years, much has been written about the numbers of physicians leaving private practice for hospital employment.  Unfortunately for many, the decision to leave a private practice has turned out to be like “jumping out of the frying pan and into the fire.”  Many physicians who thought it was time to leave a private practice setting are now having second thoughts or experiencing signs of burnout. Let’s take a look at a few reasons why it is time to reconsider the benefits of private practice.

More Autonomy

When was the last time a hospital administrator asked you for your opinion on how to improve the patient experience or create a better staff culture?  In a private practice setting, those kinds of decisions are yours to make or at a minimum be a part of the discussion.  In private practice, you can base your decisions on patient care, not a policy drafted by others who may be several years removed from the doctor-patient experience.

Workplace Culture

In a recent study, less than 50% of physicians in a hospital setting feel like they are always treated with respect.  Increasingly, in today’s healthcare workplace, culture is playing a greater role in the recruitment and retention of staff. In a private practice setting, if you are experiencing a toxic culture, look no further than the closest mirror.  You and your practice partners have the ability to create whatever type of environment works best for you and the staff.

Work/Life Balance

In private practice, you get to control how many patients per day you are going to see. You also get to decide when and how much you are going to work.  Determining what the right work/life balance is for you is a decision that can only be made by you (and your loved ones).  The good news is that if the mood strikes and you want to get away for a few days in wine country or hit the mountains for a quick ski trip, you can make it happen.

Patient Relationships

In private practice, especially in a primary care setting, you are establishing relationships with the patients you treat. Studies show that an ongoing physician-patient relationship results in greater satisfaction for both the physician and the patient.  This improved patient experience also leads to more referrals and favorable outcomes. A private practice becomes part of the fabric of a community and being connected to that care setting cannot be discounted.

Compensation

Most private practice settings allow you to set your own fees and work as many hours as you want to earn more money.  Even more so, for sub-specialties, seeing more patients means more money versus hospital system salary structures.  Additionally, efficiencies and other workflow improvements have a greater impact on the bottom-line in a private setting.  As the owner or major partner of the private practice, you decide what to do with the profits earned.

If you are interested in learning more about the private practice opportunities that Jackson Physician Search has available right now, contact a recruitment professional today.  

 

Physicians Can Improve Their Job Satisfaction

Five Ways Physicians Can Improve Their Job Satisfaction

Is your career as a physician becoming less satisfying?  Ranked as one of the most trusted professions, some doctors today are not feeling…

5 Reasons Why Doctors Search for a New Jobs

Five Reasons Why Doctors Search For a New Job

If you pay any attention at all to the stock market or financial news, you already know that the economy is booming and…

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What is the ‘Physician’s Contribution’ Really Worth?

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This is the third article in an ongoing series summarizing the findings in a recent white paper published by the President of Jackson Physician Search, Tony Stajduhar. To read “Physician Recruitment: The Cost to Hire and Return on Investment” in its entirety, find it here.

In our last article, we looked at how organizations can utilize benchmarking to drill down and find the true costs of your recruitment and hiring process.  While it is important to benchmark against national medians to understand how physician compensation and your recruitment costs will impact your return on investment, it doesn’t tell you the whole story.  Other variables that play an important role in ROI consideration are payer mix, your market’s clinician supply/demand, quality incentive payouts, and cost of living.

Finally, a big piece of the puzzle that often gets overlooked is ‘Physician Contribution.’  Simply put, physician’s contribution relates to the typical inpatient and outpatient revenues, referral revenues, and other incomes not directly related to patient care. For example, a primary care physician can generate as much as $1.5 million in indirect revenue, from labs to imaging, and hospital admissions. Additionally, as much as 10% of primary care visits result in specialty referrals!

While examining the data, it is easy to pinpoint your revenue generation indicators, what your specific referral ratios are for each physician by department, and more.  With that, you are still missing pieces of the revenue puzzle.  Physician’s contribution also includes non-monetary benefits that can’t be discounted.

Non-monetary conditions include better staff morale and patient satisfaction because the department is fully staffed.  Patients are less likely to migrate to a new provider because their needs are being met in an environment that is noticeably more efficient and timely.  Physician retention and overall organizational culture will improve leading to lower turnover, shorter vacancies, and improved fill rates.  It is important to recognize the link between a healthy culture and physician recruitment and retention.  Healthy workplace culture is not a condition that is hidden from view. Being recognized as a great place to work is generally known within community circles and any physician, or any potential staff member, doing their due diligence on a job opportunity will learn that information.

Organizations that aren’t focused on creating a healthy culture will ultimately pay a price.  Research demonstrates a direct link between culture and performance measurables related to healthcare. In a healthy workplace culture where the clinical staff understands their role and how it relates to the organization’s mission and values, you can find a 33% increase in overall quality.

If your organization is behind the curve on developing and maintaining a healthy culture, or if you are looking to improve your recruitment and retention process, contact us today and find out how Jackson Physician Search can help.

Benchmarking Your Recruitment Tactics

Benchmarking to Improve Your Recruitment Process

This is the second in an ongoing series summarizing the findings in a recent white paper…

The True Cost of Physician Vacancies

The True Cost of Physician Vacancies

This article is the first in a series of content that reflects upon the findings in a recent white paper published…

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Click the Get Started button if you’re ready to speak with one of our physician recruitment experts.

Benchmarking to Improve Your Recruitment Process

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This is the second in an ongoing series summarizing the findings in a recent white paper published by the President of Jackson Physician Search, Tony Stajduhar. To read “Physician Recruitment: The Cost to Hire and Return on Investment” in its entirety, find it here.

In our first white paper summary, we highlighted how much vacancies are costing healthcare organizations. Now, let’s focus on how much it costs you to recruit and fill those physician vacancies.  As if healthcare organizations don’t lose enough revenue by having lingering vacancies in their physician ranks, having an inefficient recruitment process not only wastes time and money, it also keeps the vacancy open longer.

In thinking about your organization’s recruitment process answer this simple two-part question, ‘Are we measuring key recruitment metrics, and if so, are we acting on the data?’  If you answered no to either of the above, then your recruitment process is in dire need of attention.  Here are a few key indicators you should be measuring:

  • Time to Fill – Team Satisfaction Scores
  • # of Interviews to Hire
  • # of New and Returning Patients
  • Acceptance Rate percentage
  • Three- and Five-year retention rates
  • Physician Satisfaction Scores

Benchmarking your recruitment process from top to bottom allows you to reveal inefficiencies and make the necessary corrections for improvement. No matter how successful your recruitment process may have been in the past, as times change and the candidate profiles change, what worked yesterday doesn’t necessarily work today.

A recent survey found that 95% of physicians want to receive job information by email, but the volume of contacts they receive are watering down the effectiveness of solicitation. Over 39% of physicians report multiple job solicitations each week. Compounding the issue is that doctors are finding that they are receiving relevant information less than 10% of the time. It is critical for organizations to do a deeper dive into creating targeted emails that resonate with the recipients. Refining the email content to be more relevant can be achieved if you are collecting the data and acting upon the results.

An effective way to engage physicians who may be interested in a career move, is through social media, as a surprising 87% of physicians between the ages of 26 and 55 are using social media platforms. The key for savvy healthcare organizations is to attract passive candidates by producing fresh, interesting content that sets you apart from your competitors. If physicians are drawn to your content because it piques their interest, you are essentially recruiting them before they even know it.

If you feel that your recruitment process is suffering from the same old, same old and your vacancies aren’t being filled in a reasonable timeframe, it may be time for a total recruitment makeover.  Check out our ‘Guide to Developing a Strategic Physician Recruitment Plan’, or contact a Jackson Physician Search recruitment professional today.

 

Jackson Physician Search Physician Recruitment ROI White Paper

[White Paper] Physician Recruitment: The Cost to Hire and Return on Investment

President of Jackson Physician Search, Tony Stajduhar, gives insight into how vacancies and recruiting can quickly become costly. If you’re looking to optimize your ROI when it…

The True Cost of Physician Vacancies

The True Cost of Physician Vacancies

According to a 2018 Association of Physician Recruiters’ (ASPR) survey, 40% of physician vacancies in 2017 went unfilled.  The largest …

Need Help Recruiting Physicians?

Click the Get Started button if you’re ready to speak with one of our physician recruitment experts.

The True Cost of Physician Vacancies

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This article is the first in a series of content that reflects upon the findings in a recent white paper published by Tony Stajduhar, President, of Jackson Physician Search, titled Physician Recruitment: The Costs to Hire and Return on Investment.

According to a 2018 Association of Physician Recruiters’ (ASPR) survey, 40% of physician vacancies in 2017 went unfilled.  The largest number of hiring searches were for family medicine, hospital medicine, internal medicine, neurology, and urgent care.  With these shortages in mind, it is even more concerning when you realize that by 2020, almost 33% of active physicians will be 65 years of age and older.  If you are struggling with filling physician vacancies, check out our Guide to Physician Recruitment.  But first, let’s examine the true cost of physician vacancies.

Loss of Revenue 

The first and most obvious cost of a physician vacancy is the loss of revenue. For example, a Gastroenterologist generates almost $2 million in gross charges, while an Orthopedic Surgeon can generate almost $1.8 million in charges. Annualizing these numbers show that a hospital or medical group can lose between $150,000 and $170,000 per month for specialist vacancies.

Patient Migration 

Not as clearly defined, but just as critical are the numbers of patients that are lost while there is a vacancy. If a physician leaves, there is the danger of losing all of the patients that were already loyal to that doctor, especially if there is not a viable alternative already on staff. Hospitals and groups also lose out on referrals and the peripheral losses of not having a flow of patient to doctor and doctor to doctor referrals.

Market Share 

When vacancies are unfilled, that doesn’t mean that patients needing services halt until the position is filled. Anytime patients are forced to seek specific services elsewhere, your competitor is reaping the benefit. Once a competitor has an opportunity to develop a relationship with someone who was once loyal to your facility, the opportunity to recover them as a client diminishes exponentially.

Longer Time to Fill = More Costs

Different specialties have a wide variation in the typical time to fill. Bearing in mind the monetary losses and the ancillary losses the length of time your vacancy goes unfilled is critical. The ASPR reports that a family medicine vacancy is typically open 4.3 months, while a surgical vacancy can be open for 10 months or more based on the specialty and the location.

 

It is clear that the demand for physicians, coupled with a dwindling supply is not going away anytime soon. As physician vacancies continue to go unfilled and healthcare organizations struggle to manage the costs, the industry as a whole will be in a perpetual state of “all hands on deck” until the physician pipeline is stable once again.

If your organization is all too familiar with the costs associated with lingering physician vacancies, check out our report on How to Create Growth and ROI through Recruitment and Retention.

Physician Hiring Outlook

2019 Outlook for Hiring Physicians

For several years, reports of the ongoing physician shortage have dominated the headlines.  To give healthcare leaders the comprehensive information they need to invest and adjust to the physician shortage…

Create a Cultural Blueprint for Successful Physician Recruitment

How to Create a Cultural Blueprint for Successful Physician Recruitment

Culture is defined as “values, beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors that employees share and exhibit on a daily basis in their work and in the community”. And, lack of cultural fit is among the top reasons…

Need Help Recruiting Physicians?

Click the Get Started button if you’re ready to speak with one of our physician recruitment experts.

[White Paper] Issues Affecting FQHCs: What will it take for Federally Qualified Health Centers to survive in today’s healthcare physician recruiting climate?

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Physician vacancies are affecting the majority of health centers across the country. This paper examines some of the recruitment and retention challenges that Federally Qualified Health Centers are facing and how to overcome them. Feel free to download and share.

Issues Affecting FQHCs

What will it take for Federally Qualified Health Centers to survive in today’s healthcare physician recruiting climate?

Jackson Physician Search in Partnership with CommonWealth Purchasing Group

A vast majority of all health centers are reporting a clinical and physician vacancy. Over the years, health centers have evolved to provide much more than primary care services in their community, but we are entering a critical time, and the shortage of physicians and clinicians overall is set to make a massive impact in the world of Community Health.

This paper examines some of the challenges that centers are facing today regarding recruitment and retention. Staffing shortages and difficulty in attracting physicians are overcome through a proactive and strategic approach to recruitment. Today, two of the top challenges are the shrinking candidate supply and changing compensation trends.

Neither of these issues are insurmountable, but they are a driving force in changing the community and rural health center model.

You can save and read the rest of this white paper by clicking the download button below.

Jackson Physician Search Physician Recruitment ROI White Paper

[White Paper] Physician Recruitment: The Cost to Hire and Return on Investment

President and CEO of Jackson Physician Search, Tony Stajduhar, gives insight into how vacancies and recruiting can quickly become costly. If you’re looking to optimize your ROI when it…

Social Media for Physician Recruitment

[White Paper] Physician Workforce through 2030: Social Media for Physician Recruitment

Download our White Paper covering Social Media for Physician Recruitment for insight into how physicians use social media and how hospital and healthcare leaders and recruiters can use…

Need Help Recruiting Physicians?

Click the Get Started button if you’re ready to speak with one of our physician recruitment experts.

[White Paper] Physician Recruitment: The Cost to Hire and Return on Investment

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President of Jackson Physician Search, Tony Stajduhar, gives insight into how vacancies and recruiting can quickly become costly. If you’re looking to reduce your cost to hire and optimize your return on investment when it comes to physician recruitment, this white paper is for you.

Physician Recruitment: The Cost to Hire and Return on Investment

by Tony Stajduhar, President, Jackson Physician Search

Healthcare organizations depend on recruiting and retaining physicians and advanced practice providers to support their mission to offer quality patient care. A critically important vacancy can be costly to the organization, patients and community as a whole, impacting healthcare delivery, quality of life and the local economy. 

Maintaining continuity of quality care is of chief importance. Yet, a sense of urgency to fill a costly vacancy must be combined with a clear understanding of how investing in a strategic recruitment process can accelerate the fill and reduce the risk of making a poor hire. 

Return on Investment is a straightforward concept that is familiar to leaders in healthcare’s outcomes-driven environment. Yet, in the area of recruitment, many organizations lack a structured method and accountability for measuring recruitment success, efficiency and return on investment. Too frequently, recruiters do not know if their definition of recruitment success is the same as their boss’s or the board’s. As a result, there is no formalized process to measure efficiency and maximize results. 

Click the download button below to read the rest of the whitepaper.

Cultural Blueprint for Successful Physician Recruitment

Focus on Fit: A Cultural Blueprint for Successful Physician Recruitment

This presentation, given by our President at the 2018 MGMA Annual Meeting, explains why cultural fit is so important and how to create a physician recruitment blueprint that focuses on fit.

Utilizing Metrics and KPIs for More Successful Recruiting

Healthcare is an outcomes-driven industry. However, many organizations lack a structured method and accountability for measuring…

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Click the Get Started button if you’re ready to speak with one of our physician recruitment experts.

2019 Outlook for Hiring Physicians

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For several years, reports of the ongoing physician shortage have dominated the headlines.  To give healthcare leaders the comprehensive information they need to invest and adjust to the physician shortage, the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) began publishing physician supply and demand reports in 2015.  The most recent update projects an even greater shortfall between supply and demand than previously forecasted.

By the Numbers – According to the AAMC, the total physician shortfall will be between 42,600 and a staggering 121,300 by the year 2030. Primary care shortages are projected up to 49,300 and non-primary care specialties up to 72,000 physicians. Oncology and Surgery are projected to be among the hardest hit specialties. The data shows that new cancer cases are likely to increase by 42% by 2025, while the number of oncologists is expected to grow by only 28%. This exacerbates the current shortage, as more than 70% of U.S. counties already have no medical oncologists. General surgery is facing a shortfall of almost 21,400 qualified surgeons over the next 5 years.

Contributing Factors – A combination of factors are creating this perfect storm which makes recruiting and retaining physicians more challenging than ever:

  • Demographics – The growing shortage is primarily due to an uncontrollable factor: demographics. America is aging, physicians included. By 2030, the number of Americans over age 65 is projected to grow by 50%, consuming healthcare at a higher rate as they age. At the same time, more than one-third of all currently active physicians will be 65 or older within the next decade.
  • Education/Residency Disconnect – Medical schools have been increasing their class sizes, but the number of residency slots have not increased commensurately to keep up with demand.
  • Working Fewer Hours – The trend toward physicians working fewer hours per week is reducing the FTE physician supply. AAMC’s updated report reflects new data showing declines in physician working hours across all age groups, not just millennials.
  • Burnout – According to the 2018 Future of Healthcare Report, 7 out of 10 physicians are unwilling to recommend healthcare as a profession because they are disheartened by changes to the practice of medicine. As many as 78% of physicians experience feelings of burnout associated with paperwork overload, frustration with Electronic Health Records (EHR) and challenges to their clinical autonomy by administrators.
  • Regulatory Burdens – A full 86% of respondents to the Medical Group Management Association 2018 survey reported an increase in regulatory burdens that impact the time they can spend with patients. More than half (54%) said that administrative overload is contributing to their likelihood of retirement within five years.

Looking Ahead – Workforce trends are important to understand for planning yet largely outside your control. But, you can improve the outlook for hiring in 2019 and beyond by focusing on factors you can influence within your organization and community.

  1. Create environments that physicians want to work in. Workplace culture will continue to be a dominant factor in attracting physicians to open positions. Your most important role as a leader is to proactively nurture a healthy cultural environment to support success in hiring and retaining physicians.
  2. Promote patient care over paperwork. Increase the utilization of clinical scribes to increase the quality and quantity of time physicians spend with patients. Also, ensure that EHR workflows are not impacting patient care.
  3. Strive for physician work/life balance. If you do not actively help physicians avoid burnout, you will continually fight turnover rates, retention deficits and prolonged vacancies. Physician assistants and nurse practitioners can ease the burden on doctors, allowing them time to pursue personal activities, research opportunities, and professional development.
  4. Embrace technology solutions. Telemedicine solutions can ease demands on over-extended physicians. Encourage patients to seek out telehealth alternatives to ease overcrowded schedules and increase the efficiency of routine office visits.
  5. Influence legislative reforms. Well-intentioned legislation often carries negative consequences on the practice of medicine.  Seek out opportunities to play a larger role in educating policy-makers about the impact of their actions on physicians and patient care.

For information about how Jackson Physician Search can help you develop attract and retain the qualified clinicians you need, contact one of our industry experts today.

Meeting Urban Recruitment Challenges

The Challenges of Urban Physician Recruitment

While the expansion of community-based facilities is a welcome development for inner cities and rural settings where most are located, it is not without challenges.  The National Association of Community Health Cent…

Recruit Physician to Rural Communities

Successfully Recruit Physicians to Rural Communities

It’s challenging to successfully recruit physicians and even harder for rural communities. Let’s look at the current state of physician recruitment, address some of the challenges rural communities fa…

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Five Reasons Why Doctors Search For a New Job

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If you pay any attention at all to the stock market or financial news, you already know that the economy is booming and the outlook for jobs is better than it has been in decades.  The same can be said for physicians, as the healthcare industry is grappling with filling open positions around the country.  If you are a physician who has not been considering finding a new job, maybe now is the right time to start looking for a new place to practice.  Let’s take a look at five reasons why Doctors search for a new job to see if any of them apply to your situation.

Experiencing feelings of burnout.

At least 50% of all doctors report feelings of burnout, with some specialties like critical care and emergency medicine slightly higher.  If you are one of those physicians experiencing burnout without a solution or help from the administration on the horizon, now is the time to explore making changes.  Burnout doesn’t just get better by itself. Instead, it takes making changes in your life, or organizational changes to alleviate some of the stressors, or finding a new job that already has processes in place to help physicians avoid burnout.

Feeling a sense of complacency.

You probably didn’t choose to practice medicine because you wanted to “punch a clock.” If you are like most, you were drawn to the excitement of medicine.  Studying different ways to treat illnesses and ailments, and digging into the science of medicine was the attraction.  If you have found that your excitement and passion is waning, and you are simply going through the motions, you have become complacent.  Finding a new job may be just the cure for your “punching the clock” blues.  A new location, new management, new ideas, even new patients can help you inject just enough discomfort into your routine to make your job fun again.

You need to keep learning and growing.

Similar to the complacency rut, when you became a physician, you went to school for a long time.  It was worth it because you knew that in the end, you would have a career and a sense of accomplishment. No matter what career people choose, most of us want to continue to grow personally and professionally.  If you are in a position that is not affording you the opportunity to grow, do research, even practice abroad occasionally, then it might be time to find an employer who wants those things for you.

Not fitting in anymore.

Workplace culture has been a focal point for successful companies for a very long time.  Not surprisingly, the healthcare industry has been behind the curve on understanding the importance of how important culture and fit is for attracting and retaining the best talent.  In healthcare, we have all read about and even experienced the rash of mergers and acquisitions that the industry is experiencing.  These developments are not always good for workplace culture.  When new leadership comes in, often times the culture and communication changes and leads to good people seeking new environs.

Work and life are out of balance.

We all want balance in our life.  As a physician, you know there will be some late nights or the occasional disruption to your social calendar, but you also probably want to have some control over it. Predictable hours, minimal call schedules (if any), and untouchable vacation and personal time should be on your short list to ensure that you can achieve the work/life balance that is so critical to being at your best.  Achieving that is no longer a pipe dream. Hospitals and health systems know that they no longer have the upper hand in physician recruitment and have been much more willing to offer attractive incentives to physician candidates.

Jackson Physician Search has the national reach and healthcare industry experience to help you find your perfect job.  To find out what we can do for your career, contact one of our recruitment professionals today.

How to Make Your Next Physician Practice Feel like a Vacation

If that headline grabbed your attention, it’s likely that you are either on vacation or wish you were! By definition, vacation is the time you spend on travel or recreation – away from work. So, ho…

Keeping up with the Dr. Joneses… and Other Ways to Sabotage Your Physician Job Search

As an in-demand physician, the chances are pretty good that you have plenty of opportunities to consider when and if you are in the market for a new practice opportunity.  There is much more to th…

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