How a Recruiter Can Help You Get Your Foot in the Door

By

Dr. Iswanto Sucandy had an impressive background and was in the process of finishing up his clinical fellowship at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, after previously completing one at Yale.  A surgeon, whose specialty was in the treatment of liver and pancreatic disease, he was looking for a position that would allow him to continue his research into the surgical techniques needed to treat cancer.  At Yale, Dr. Sucandy was trained in Advanced Minimally Invasive Surgery, while his training at UPMC included Hepatobiliary surgery.  His time at UPMC had earned him some renown for pioneering minimally invasive liver and pancreas resections. In May of 2016, Carly Clem, Senior Director of Recruiting at Jackson Physician Search contacted the promising young liver specialist believing she had an appropriate placement opportunity for him.

Carly knew this would be a great opportunity for Dr. Sucandy even if it would take a little convincing on her part.  At first, the hospital was a bit hesitant because they had been looking for a surgeon with years of experience and Dr. Sucandy was a new graduate.  But, she knew that he would thrive at Florida Hosptial if just given the opportunity.  She eventually convinced Florida Hospital to grant Dr. Sucandy an interview, and as expected, they soon learned just how impressive he was.  He nailed the interview process, and Florida Hospital couldn’t wait to get him on their team.

The rest, as they say, is history!  Dr. Sucandy has been doing amazing work at Florida Hospital and is earning a worldwide reputation for his surgical advancements.  In a recent case, he and another surgeon at Florida Hospital, performed a 3.5-hour operation on a patient to remove a tumor that had invaded two-thirds of her liver. Even the most minor error could have caused immediate death for the patient. Dr. Sucandy’s procedure was successful, and the patient is now cancer-free.

Stories like this one are not uncommon in physician recruitment.  A good recruiter, like Carly, learns about the facilities where she is trying to place a doctor, and also gets to know her physicians. She convinced Florida Hospital to give Dr. Sucandy an interview because she recognized that he would be a great fit, and with his impressive skillset would have an opportunity to be successful there.

To learn more about what a recruitment professional can do for your career, contact Jackson Physician Search today.

Choosing a smaller community to have a bigger impact

The Job You Want May Not Be the One You Need

We’ve recently worked with a physician who thought it was time to make a move from a small rural community setting into a large metro area.

2019 Physician Job Search Outlook

2019 Physician Job Search Outlook

Let’s look at the 2019 Physician Job Search Outlook.  With 2019 right around the corner, is it the perfect time to start planning to change jobs, retire early, get out of private practice…

Start Your Job Search

Click the Search Jobs button to browse our current openings.

What to Do About the Biggest Physician Recruitment Issues Affecting FQHC’s in 2019

By

As physician recruitment becomes even more competitive each year, Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHC) are feeling the brunt of the challenges. Jackson Physician Search, in partnership with CommonWealth Purchasing Group, recently published a white paper on the Issues Affecting FQHC’s.  Here is a brief synopsis of the major talking points.

Shrinking Candidate Pool

The National Association of Community Health Centers is reporting that at least 95% of all health centers are reporting a clinical vacancy, with 70% of those being a physician opening.  Because CHC’s are expected to be managing the care of more than 35 million patients by 2020, not having candidates to fill vacancies is going to be impacting communities across the United States.  As you might expect, primary care is the hardest hit regarding vacancies, but keep in mind that CHC’s are providing a broader range of services than traditional primary care. Reports show that less than 6% of medical students plan to practice Family Medicine and 2% are pursuing internal medicine.

Compensation Models Have Changed

In years past, CHC’s would promote “non-monetary” benefits to practicing in a CHC. Things like a better schedule and quality of work/life balance, all used to be part of the draw to a small health center. Those advantages are no longer exclusive to CHC’s and rural practice settings.  Now, hospitals of all sizes are using every means available to attract qualified candidates in this highly competitive recruitment environment.  Salaries and sign-on bonuses are rising, loan forgiveness is being offered, and FQHC’s are having a difficult time keeping pace.

Four Things that FQHC’s Can Do to Recruit and Retain Staff

  1. Develop a Brand Strategy and Recruitment Marketing Plan – Less than 25% of FQHC’s have a fully implemented marketing plan. Physicians today are more interested in things like organizational culture and work environment than in years past. This is an area that a smaller health center can excel at if the time and attention is paid to developing a winning brand that highlights culture, values, and work/life balance.
  2. Develop Local and Regional Outreach Campaigns – FQHC’s can compete through the development of training partnerships with local or regional academic institutions. Attracting and retaining local talent can be accomplished with a solid brand strategy, promoting training partnerships, shadowing and mentor programs and other similar community relationships that draw candidates into a facility.
  3. Create a Comprehensive Retention Program – Recruiting a physician is only one-half of the battle. Having to replace a physician can take as long as 24 months and cost more than $500,000. By developing internal systems that monitor physician and staff satisfaction and continually cultivate a positive workplace culture, health centers can proactively achieve better retention. Also, by focusing on the type of employee that embodies their culture, they are prone to attract and hire individuals who fit that culture.
  4. Review Your Compensation Model and Delivery Team – Health centers are no longer able to get physicians “at a discount.” Salaries are much more competitive today across all practice settings, so CHC’s are being forced to be more creative. Implementing productivity metrics is one way to improve a physician’s base salary. CHC’s are also more commonly offering 3- or 4-day work weeks as a quality of life benefit.  This trend coincides with the utilization of more nurse practitioners and physician assistants to supplement the staff.

There is no simple answer to how FQHC’s can compete in the ultra-competitive physician recruitment and retention environment.  What is required is a fully developed strategy that incorporates many or all of the elements identified.  As Community Health Centers continue to play an integral role in the healthcare industry and more importantly in helping the patients and communities where they are located, it is critical that we as an industry support their needs.

If you are looking for a partner with the resources, experience, and nationwide reach to help solve your critical recruitment and retention challenges, contact Jackson Physician Search and find out how we can help today.

 

Jackson Physician Search Issues Affecting FQHCs White Paper

[White Paper] Issues Affecting FQHCs: What will it take for Federally Qualified Health Centers to survive in today’s healthcare physician recruiting climate?

Physician vacancies are affecting the majority of health centers across the country. This paper examines some of the recruitment and retention challenges that Federally Qualified Health Centers are…

Physician Hiring Outlook

2019 Outlook for Hiring Physicians

For several years, reports of the ongoing physician shortage have dominated the headlines.  To give healthcare leaders the comprehensive information they need to invest and adjust…

Need Help Recruiting Physicians?

Click the Get Started button if you’re ready to speak with one of our physician recruitment experts.

Benefits for Physicians Who Choose a Small Practice

By

So, you are a physician in a large metropolitan hospital-owned practice, with a big salary, professional prestige, invites to all of the local galas, and everything else that goes along with being a part of a large healthcare organization.  But the important question to ask yourself is…Are you happy?  If your answer is a resounding yes, then congratulations for achieving the success that you worked so hard for all these years.  If not, there is no better time to change things up than now.  The job market for physicians is roaring across all practice settings, and if you are tired of working in a large system, maybe it is time to think about a small practice.  Let’s take a look at the benefits of practicing in a small community setting versus the large organization you are used to.

Fewer layers often mean better communication.

The first thing you will notice about applying to practice in a smaller community setting is that there aren’t as many layers of management to navigate.  In fact, in many cases, you will be meeting and negotiating directly with the CEO.  In a smaller setting, contracts are typically negotiated and approved faster, changes to workflows or procedures can be made more quickly, often times right on the spot.  Overall, decision making happens faster when it occurs directly between the key stakeholders rather than through meetings, memos, and managers.

Having a voice in the organization.

To build upon the direct communication theme – in a smaller community practice setting, you will be looked upon as one of the key stakeholders/decision makers.  Having a voice in how the organization is managed can be incredibly energizing when you have spent your career as one among hundreds.  Being able to present and implement your ideas will increase your sense of ownership in the workplace, and allow you to contribute in ways other than through medicine.

Cultivating a great workplace culture.

Being looked upon as a key member of a small practice means that you have an opportunity to be a part of making it a great place to work. Everyone wants to feel good about going to work every day, and as soon as it feels like you are punching a clock, it is no longer as rewarding.  Fortunately, in your position as a leader, you can have a direct impact on the workplace culture.  Creating a culture with open communication, mutual respect from top to bottom, and ensuring that everyone is accountable for their individual responsibilities is a sure way for staff and physicians alike to be excited to come to work every day.

Being a key member of the community.

In a smaller practice setting, you could be one of only a few doctors in an entire town.  That immediately makes you one of the biggest fish in a small pond and provides you with an entirely new level of status.  Being respected and known by just about everyone in the community can be a great boost for your self-esteem.  A smaller community setting also allows you to get to know all of your patients.  In other practice settings that may be the case to some degree, but in a small community setting, you can be on a first name basis with all of your patients.

There are plenty of reasons to consider making the switch to a small community setting over a large healthcare organization, including developing a better work/life balance.  Only you can know what is best for your career and lifestyle.  If you want to explore various opportunities in small practice settings across the country, contact a Jackson Physician Search recruitment professional and get started today!

The Benefits of Private Practice

Is it Time to Reconsider the Benefits of Private Practice?

In recent years, much has been written about the numbers of physicians leaving private practice for hospital employment.  Unfortunately for many, the decision to leave a private practice…

Advance Your Physician Career with a New Job

How To Advance Your Physician Career With a New Job

As you look to advance your physician career with a new job, the most important question you must ask yourself is why are you considering a change?  Your reasons will drive how you…

Start Your Job Search

Click the Search Jobs button to browse our current openings.

How to Close Physician Recruitment Gaps and Improve ROI in 2019

By

This is the final article in an ongoing series summarizing the findings in a recent white paper published by the President of Jackson Physician Search, Tony Stajduhar. To read “Physician Recruitment: The Cost to Hire and Return on Investment” in its entirety, find it here.

The physician shortage is our current reality across the healthcare industry.  Treating it as anything less than an urgent situation is a step closer to a financial cliff. Your key consideration in all of this is how well your recruiting and hiring process is working.  If your recruitment process is broken and your time to fill rates are lagging, then the chances are you are going to end up with a bad hire anyway.  The time to invest in the implementation of key best practices to improve your hiring process and create success in the recruitment process is now.  Here are a few ways you can close your physician recruitment gaps, improve your hiring process, and see a better return on investment.

  1. Continuous Recruiting – Just because you have identified a group of candidates and scheduled interviews, don’t stop recruiting. It is important to continue the process until you have a signed contract in hand.  Why you ask? First, at any point in the process, you may find yourself back at square one due to unforeseen circumstances. Second, you need to maintain your leverage throughout the negotiating process and keep your potential candidates engaged.  Lastly, it is important to create a memorable experience for the candidates you meet to keep your referral pipeline full and also keep them engaged for future needs.
  2. Don’t Get Stuck on Cost per Hire – While the cost per hire is an important metric, viewing your recruitment process in its entirety allows you to measure whether or not you have made a good hire in the long run. The quality of hire impacts your return on investment because of turnover, loss of patient loyalty, quality of care, and other issues.
  3. Strategic Partnerships Can Improve ROI – Sometimes finding the right strategic partner is the key to improving your recruitment process. Smaller systems or community health centers may not be equipped to cast a wide enough net to attract the right candidate to a position. Finding a partner that can manage the digital tools available and has a trusted reputation in the industry will allow your key internal leaders to focus on creating a quality interview process and keeping the process on track.
  4. Paint a Better Picture – As a candidate goes through the recruitment process, there are many considerations that they are internally processing. For example, is the community a place that is a good fit for their family? They are going to be assessing your workplace culture and whether or not they can envision themselves fitting in and contributing. Far too often, the process gets bogged down by paperwork and non-human considerations.  Instead, create an onboarding process that caters to them as a person and their family as a whole. Highlight the community, the schools, and the things that will engage them in the longer term.  Focusing on the person first creates an environment that builds trust, rapport, and retention, not to mention word of mouth that benefits your referral pipeline.

If your organization is suffering from a lackluster recruitment process or is saddled by too many bad hires, we can help.  Jackson Physician Search has the experience, nation-wide reach, and industry knowledge to help you streamline your recruitment, hiring, and retention process.  Contact our team today and find out how we can be the strategic partner you need.

Benchmarking Your Recruitment Tactics

Benchmarking to Improve Your Recruitment Process

This is the second in an ongoing series summarizing the findings in a recent white paper published by the President of Jackson Physician Search…

Physician’s Contribution

What is the ‘Physician’s Contribution’ Really Worth?

This is the second in an ongoing series summarizing the findings in a recent white paper published by the President of Jackson Physician Search…

Need Help Recruiting Physicians?

Click the Get Started button if you’re ready to speak with one of our physician recruitment experts.

Is it Time to Reconsider the Benefits of Private Practice?

By

In recent years, much has been written about the numbers of physicians leaving private practice for hospital employment.  Unfortunately for many, the decision to leave a private practice has turned out to be like “jumping out of the frying pan and into the fire.”  Many physicians who thought it was time to leave a private practice setting are now having second thoughts or experiencing signs of burnout. Let’s take a look at a few reasons why it is time to reconsider the benefits of private practice.

More Autonomy

When was the last time a hospital administrator asked you for your opinion on how to improve the patient experience or create a better staff culture?  In a private practice setting, those kinds of decisions are yours to make or at a minimum be a part of the discussion.  In private practice, you can base your decisions on patient care, not a policy drafted by others who may be several years removed from the doctor-patient experience.

Workplace Culture

In a recent study, less than 50% of physicians in a hospital setting feel like they are always treated with respect.  Increasingly, in today’s healthcare workplace, culture is playing a greater role in the recruitment and retention of staff. In a private practice setting, if you are experiencing a toxic culture, look no further than the closest mirror.  You and your practice partners have the ability to create whatever type of environment works best for you and the staff.

Work/Life Balance

In private practice, you get to control how many patients per day you are going to see. You also get to decide when and how much you are going to work.  Determining what the right work/life balance is for you is a decision that can only be made by you (and your loved ones).  The good news is that if the mood strikes and you want to get away for a few days in wine country or hit the mountains for a quick ski trip, you can make it happen.

Patient Relationships

In private practice, especially in a primary care setting, you are establishing relationships with the patients you treat. Studies show that an ongoing physician-patient relationship results in greater satisfaction for both the physician and the patient.  This improved patient experience also leads to more referrals and favorable outcomes. A private practice becomes part of the fabric of a community and being connected to that care setting cannot be discounted.

Compensation

Most private practice settings allow you to set your own fees and work as many hours as you want to earn more money.  Even more so, for sub-specialties, seeing more patients means more money versus hospital system salary structures.  Additionally, efficiencies and other workflow improvements have a greater impact on the bottom-line in a private setting.  As the owner or major partner of the private practice, you decide what to do with the profits earned.

If you are interested in learning more about the private practice opportunities that Jackson Physician Search has available right now, contact a recruitment professional today.  

 

Physicians Can Improve Their Job Satisfaction

Five Ways Physicians Can Improve Their Job Satisfaction

Is your career as a physician becoming less satisfying?  Ranked as one of the most trusted professions, some doctors today are not feeling…

5 Reasons Why Doctors Search for a New Jobs

Five Reasons Why Doctors Search For a New Job

If you pay any attention at all to the stock market or financial news, you already know that the economy is booming and…

Start Your Job Search

Click the Search Jobs button to browse our current openings.

What is the ‘Physician’s Contribution’ Really Worth?

By

This is the third article in an ongoing series summarizing the findings in a recent white paper published by the President of Jackson Physician Search, Tony Stajduhar. To read “Physician Recruitment: The Cost to Hire and Return on Investment” in its entirety, find it here.

In our last article, we looked at how organizations can utilize benchmarking to drill down and find the true costs of your recruitment and hiring process.  While it is important to benchmark against national medians to understand how physician compensation and your recruitment costs will impact your return on investment, it doesn’t tell you the whole story.  Other variables that play an important role in ROI consideration are payer mix, your market’s clinician supply/demand, quality incentive payouts, and cost of living.

Finally, a big piece of the puzzle that often gets overlooked is ‘Physician Contribution.’  Simply put, physician’s contribution relates to the typical inpatient and outpatient revenues, referral revenues, and other incomes not directly related to patient care. For example, a primary care physician can generate as much as $1.5 million in indirect revenue, from labs to imaging, and hospital admissions. Additionally, as much as 10% of primary care visits result in specialty referrals!

While examining the data, it is easy to pinpoint your revenue generation indicators, what your specific referral ratios are for each physician by department, and more.  With that, you are still missing pieces of the revenue puzzle.  Physician’s contribution also includes non-monetary benefits that can’t be discounted.

Non-monetary conditions include better staff morale and patient satisfaction because the department is fully staffed.  Patients are less likely to migrate to a new provider because their needs are being met in an environment that is noticeably more efficient and timely.  Physician retention and overall organizational culture will improve leading to lower turnover, shorter vacancies, and improved fill rates.  It is important to recognize the link between a healthy culture and physician recruitment and retention.  Healthy workplace culture is not a condition that is hidden from view. Being recognized as a great place to work is generally known within community circles and any physician, or any potential staff member, doing their due diligence on a job opportunity will learn that information.

Organizations that aren’t focused on creating a healthy culture will ultimately pay a price.  Research demonstrates a direct link between culture and performance measurables related to healthcare. In a healthy workplace culture where the clinical staff understands their role and how it relates to the organization’s mission and values, you can find a 33% increase in overall quality.

If your organization is behind the curve on developing and maintaining a healthy culture, or if you are looking to improve your recruitment and retention process, contact us today and find out how Jackson Physician Search can help.

Benchmarking Your Recruitment Tactics

Benchmarking to Improve Your Recruitment Process

This is the second in an ongoing series summarizing the findings in a recent white paper…

The True Cost of Physician Vacancies

The True Cost of Physician Vacancies

This article is the first in a series of content that reflects upon the findings in a recent white paper published…

Need Help Recruiting Physicians?

Click the Get Started button if you’re ready to speak with one of our physician recruitment experts.

Benchmarking to Improve Your Recruitment Process

By

This is the second in an ongoing series summarizing the findings in a recent white paper published by the President of Jackson Physician Search, Tony Stajduhar. To read “Physician Recruitment: The Cost to Hire and Return on Investment” in its entirety, find it here.

In our first white paper summary, we highlighted how much vacancies are costing healthcare organizations. Now, let’s focus on how much it costs you to recruit and fill those physician vacancies.  As if healthcare organizations don’t lose enough revenue by having lingering vacancies in their physician ranks, having an inefficient recruitment process not only wastes time and money, it also keeps the vacancy open longer.

In thinking about your organization’s recruitment process answer this simple two-part question, ‘Are we measuring key recruitment metrics, and if so, are we acting on the data?’  If you answered no to either of the above, then your recruitment process is in dire need of attention.  Here are a few key indicators you should be measuring:

  • Time to Fill – Team Satisfaction Scores
  • # of Interviews to Hire
  • # of New and Returning Patients
  • Acceptance Rate percentage
  • Three- and Five-year retention rates
  • Physician Satisfaction Scores

Benchmarking your recruitment process from top to bottom allows you to reveal inefficiencies and make the necessary corrections for improvement. No matter how successful your recruitment process may have been in the past, as times change and the candidate profiles change, what worked yesterday doesn’t necessarily work today.

A recent survey found that 95% of physicians want to receive job information by email, but the volume of contacts they receive are watering down the effectiveness of solicitation. Over 39% of physicians report multiple job solicitations each week. Compounding the issue is that doctors are finding that they are receiving relevant information less than 10% of the time. It is critical for organizations to do a deeper dive into creating targeted emails that resonate with the recipients. Refining the email content to be more relevant can be achieved if you are collecting the data and acting upon the results.

An effective way to engage physicians who may be interested in a career move, is through social media, as a surprising 87% of physicians between the ages of 26 and 55 are using social media platforms. The key for savvy healthcare organizations is to attract passive candidates by producing fresh, interesting content that sets you apart from your competitors. If physicians are drawn to your content because it piques their interest, you are essentially recruiting them before they even know it.

If you feel that your recruitment process is suffering from the same old, same old and your vacancies aren’t being filled in a reasonable timeframe, it may be time for a total recruitment makeover.  Check out our ‘Guide to Developing a Strategic Physician Recruitment Plan’, or contact a Jackson Physician Search recruitment professional today.

 

Jackson Physician Search Physician Recruitment ROI White Paper

[White Paper] Physician Recruitment: The Cost to Hire and Return on Investment

President of Jackson Physician Search, Tony Stajduhar, gives insight into how vacancies and recruiting can quickly become costly. If you’re looking to optimize your ROI when it…

The True Cost of Physician Vacancies

The True Cost of Physician Vacancies

According to a 2018 Association of Physician Recruiters’ (ASPR) survey, 40% of physician vacancies in 2017 went unfilled.  The largest …

Need Help Recruiting Physicians?

Click the Get Started button if you’re ready to speak with one of our physician recruitment experts.

The True Cost of Physician Vacancies

By

This article is the first in a series of content that reflects upon the findings in a recent white paper published by Tony Stajduhar, President, of Jackson Physician Search, titled Physician Recruitment: The Costs to Hire and Return on Investment.

According to a 2018 Association of Physician Recruiters’ (ASPR) survey, 40% of physician vacancies in 2017 went unfilled.  The largest number of hiring searches were for family medicine, hospital medicine, internal medicine, neurology, and urgent care.  With these shortages in mind, it is even more concerning when you realize that by 2020, almost 33% of active physicians will be 65 years of age and older.  If you are struggling with filling physician vacancies, check out our Guide to Physician Recruitment.  But first, let’s examine the true cost of physician vacancies.

Loss of Revenue 

The first and most obvious cost of a physician vacancy is the loss of revenue. For example, a Gastroenterologist generates almost $2 million in gross charges, while an Orthopedic Surgeon can generate almost $1.8 million in charges. Annualizing these numbers show that a hospital or medical group can lose between $150,000 and $170,000 per month for specialist vacancies.

Patient Migration 

Not as clearly defined, but just as critical are the numbers of patients that are lost while there is a vacancy. If a physician leaves, there is the danger of losing all of the patients that were already loyal to that doctor, especially if there is not a viable alternative already on staff. Hospitals and groups also lose out on referrals and the peripheral losses of not having a flow of patient to doctor and doctor to doctor referrals.

Market Share 

When vacancies are unfilled, that doesn’t mean that patients needing services halt until the position is filled. Anytime patients are forced to seek specific services elsewhere, your competitor is reaping the benefit. Once a competitor has an opportunity to develop a relationship with someone who was once loyal to your facility, the opportunity to recover them as a client diminishes exponentially.

Longer Time to Fill = More Costs

Different specialties have a wide variation in the typical time to fill. Bearing in mind the monetary losses and the ancillary losses the length of time your vacancy goes unfilled is critical. The ASPR reports that a family medicine vacancy is typically open 4.3 months, while a surgical vacancy can be open for 10 months or more based on the specialty and the location.

 

It is clear that the demand for physicians, coupled with a dwindling supply is not going away anytime soon. As physician vacancies continue to go unfilled and healthcare organizations struggle to manage the costs, the industry as a whole will be in a perpetual state of “all hands on deck” until the physician pipeline is stable once again.

If your organization is all too familiar with the costs associated with lingering physician vacancies, check out our report on How to Create Growth and ROI through Recruitment and Retention.

Physician Hiring Outlook

2019 Outlook for Hiring Physicians

For several years, reports of the ongoing physician shortage have dominated the headlines.  To give healthcare leaders the comprehensive information they need to invest and adjust to the physician shortage…

Create a Cultural Blueprint for Successful Physician Recruitment

How to Create a Cultural Blueprint for Successful Physician Recruitment

Culture is defined as “values, beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors that employees share and exhibit on a daily basis in their work and in the community”. And, lack of cultural fit is among the top reasons…

Need Help Recruiting Physicians?

Click the Get Started button if you’re ready to speak with one of our physician recruitment experts.

The Job You Want May Not Be the One You Need

By

We’ve recently worked with a physician who thought it was time to make a move from a small rural community setting into a large metro area.  By working with a recruiter at Jackson Physician Search, he found a position that met all of his personal and professional needs.  Here is his recruitment story.

Our physician, let’s refer to him as Dr. Smith, had been working in rural Northern Kentucky for several years.  Having recently married, Dr. Smith felt he was ready to explore opportunities in larger metropolitan areas.  He began by considering cities like Chicago, hoping for access to cultural activities and better schools for his daughter.  He quickly learned that his personal and professional needs might be better met in a mid-sized community and practice. It surprised him to find that the large group he was interviewing with wasn’t very responsive and he felt that working there, he would be just another number.

He began working with Helen Falkner, Sr. Director of Recruiting at Jackson Physician Search, who has been helping doctors, and other medical professionals find their perfect job for years. They began by narrowing down the things that were most important to him and his new family. He wanted a position affording him a better work/life balance and a location that offered the amenities of a larger metropolitan area.  When Helen told Dr. Smith about an opportunity she had in a Midwestern university town, he was unfamiliar with the community and initially skeptical.  However, Dr. Smith knew that keeping an open mind is critical and that it would be worth it to do his due diligence on the job.

The first thing that struck Dr. Smith when he arrived for his interview was that he was meeting directly with the CEO of the clinic.  He felt very comfortable having that direct line of communication with the CEO, and it allowed for a streamlined decision-making process. Dr. Smith was pleasantly surprised to find that the facility was very physician-centric and they were extremely motivated to learn more about him and his family. He knew if he joined them, that he would be more than just another doctor.

Being a college town, and also located less than an hour from a major metropolitan area, Dr. Smith and his family found that they would have access to vibrant cultural scenes, concerts, great restaurants, and a top school system.  The organization was very accommodating with Dr. Smith’s salary and scheduling preferences, and he gladly accepted their offer to join the team.

Dr. Smith’s story is not unlike many others in today’s ultra-competitive physician search environment, and it includes some key takeaways for consideration. Dr. Smith kept an open mind throughout the process and working with his recruiter, stayed focused on the things most important to him and his family.  He also recognized that in a smaller setting, he had the opportunity to become a part of the community and work in a more comfortable, inclusive environment. The only investment Dr. Smith had to make was the time he spent interviewing.  By overcoming his preconceived notions of what he thought he wanted, Dr. Smith ended up as part of a tight-knit team in a location that met all of his family’s needs.

If you are ready to find your next opportunity, check out our job portal to search for your next job or connect with Helen directly on her LinkedIn page.

choosing education the right shcools

JPS Recruiters Live: Optimizing for Your Children’s Education

Often, we get asked by doctors that are looking to relocate for help with assessing schools and school districts. We know that the education of their children is very important to…

5 Reasons Why Doctors Search for a New Jobs

Five Reasons Why Doctors Search For a New Job

If you pay any attention at all to the stock market or financial news, you already know that the economy is booming and the outlook for jobs is better than it has been in decades…

Start Your Job Search

Click the Search Jobs button to browse our current openings.

Gift Yourself a New Job This Holiday Season

By

The holidays are here, and 2019 is around the corner. You suddenly realize that the job search you vowed to start early is now behind schedule.  Don’t panic! You still have time to start your holiday job search — Just use our guide and the holiday calendar to plan, prioritize and set deadlines for achievable milestones.

Make your List (and check it twice):

  • Create a checklist of criteria so you can objectively prioritize your search.
  • Be sure your CV is ready to submit for practice opportunities that meet your criteria.
  • Finalize your short list of appealing communities and organizations.
  • Identify your references and alert them to possible inquiries.

Get a Helper:

  • Share the details of your career and personal goals with a trusted recruiter.
  • You can rely on their objectivity, network of connections and knowledge of the marketplace.
  • They will help focus your search and avoid roadblocks, without charge or obligation.

Plan Ahead to Avoid Dashing Around:

  • With holiday calendars (and available flights) filling up, be quick and decisive about scheduling interviews.
  • Outline pertinent questions about compensation, practice parameters and the community.
  • Start phone interviews in December and schedule on-site interviews to take place just after New Years.

New Year’s Day Assessment:

  • Assess your progress, including upcoming interviews and offers on the table.
  • Ask for feedback to understand where any disconnects occurred.
  • Share that information with your recruiter – you need objective advice!
  • Plan your follow-up steps. If no offers are in hand, you may need to change the parameters of your search and conduct more due diligence to improve your chances of success.

MLK Day Decisions:

  • Prioritize the offers you have received.
  • Compare compensation packages using trusted sources for salary surveys and calculators that incorporate multiple variables.
  • Consult trusted advisors who can help compare the variables and explain contractual terms.
  • Be prepared to make a decision.

Sweet Success by Valentine’s Day:

  • Celebrate the sweet success of accepting an offer!
  • Meet the deadlines for securing your license, hospital privileges and credentialing with payers.
  • Explore housing and make relocation plans.

Physicians who accept an offer early enjoy:

  • The opportunity to earn a stipend, signing bonus or another incentive for early commitment.
  • Less stress and fewer scheduling conflicts during their final semester of residency.
  • Peace of mind to enjoy their first few months after graduation.
  • The opportunity to be productive in your practice as soon as you arrive.

Finding your first or next practice opportunity can be challenging and overwhelming.  An experienced recruiter can ease the process and serve as a guide through the process. They know the hiring organizations first-hand and have visited the practice sites you’re considering. They will streamline the process and keep you on track.

Get started now by exploring Jackson Physician Search opportunities and learning why physicians choose to work with Jackson Physician Search recruiters.

2019 Physician Job Search Outlook

2019 Physician Job Search Outlook

Let’s look at the 2019 Hiring Outlook for Physicians.  With 2019 right around the corner, is it the perfect time to start planning to change jobs, retire early, get out of private practice…

Advance Your Physician Career with a New Job

How to Advance Your Physician Career With a New Job

As you look to advance your physician career with a new job, the most important question you must ask yourself is why are you considering a change?  Your reasons will drive…

Start Your Job Search

Click the Search Jobs button to browse our current openings.