Reducing Paperwork to Help Combat Physician Burnout

By

In January, Medscape released the results of their 2019 National Physician Burnout, Depression & Suicide Report.  This comprehensive report collected information from 15,000 physicians in 29 different specialties.  While 44% of physician respondents reported feeling burned out, and another 15% reported being colloquially or clinically depressed, the driver behind these responses may surprise you. Almost 60% of respondents reported that they are burdened by too many bureaucratic tasks like charting and paperwork.  The next closest factor as identified in the survey was spending too many hours at work which came in at 34%.

Clearly, if physicians are telling us that working too many hours is contributing to their feelings of burnout, imagine how frustrating it would be to know that paperwork and bureaucracy is one of the leading reasons for your long work days. A study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine determined that for every hour a doctor is treating patients, they are spending two hours on paperwork! Burdensome clerical activity is even creeping into the time physicians are examining their patients as the study found that almost 37% of the face-to-face patient time is spent on electronic health records (EHR) and other clerical work.

Ways to reduce administrative burdens

If the results of these studies sound all too familiar, here are several ways you can alleviate some of that workload and free up more time to spend on patient care.

Get Involved – Believe it or not, health care industry leaders and federal agencies all realize that change is needed to allow physicians to spend more time focused on their patient and less on recordkeeping. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) is initiating changes to reduce the administrative burden on Physicians as part of its comprehensive “Patients over Paperwork” initiative. Physicians that have identified confusing and/or time consuming documentation are encouraged to report them to ReducingProviderBurden@cms.hhs.gov.

Share the Burden – Physicians at UCLA Health and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center are reducing the amount of time they spend on documentation through new virtual note-taking technology, Our Notes. Developed by OpenNotes, the concept promotes having the patients participate in the note-taking process in collaboration with the physician.  Research has shown that involving the patient in documenting the visit leads to increased patient engagement and improved communication between the physician and the patient.

Smart Glasses – Another exciting tech development that healthcare organizations are piloting involves Google’s Smart Glasses.  Recently relaunched, the Smart Glasses are set up to link with proprietary software, like Augmedix, a remote scribe service that records all of the clinical notes for the physician.  Clinicians who are using this technology report that the device is shaving as much as 30% from their administrative time which can be used for additional patients or improving their quality of life.

Whether through regulatory changes, technology, or even hiring additional support staff, like Medical Assistants, healthcare industry leaders realize that changes need to be made to support physicians.  More doctors are feeling the effects of burnout and reducing the amount of time they are spending on documentation and bureaucracy is one way to help them manage their work-related pressures.

If you are ready to explore new career opportunities or find an organization that is a better fit for you personally and professionally, contact a Jackson Physician Search recruitment professional today.  Our team has decades of industry experience and a nationwide reach to find you the best fit for the next step in your career.

 

Physicians Can Improve Their Job Satisfaction

Five Ways Physicians Can Improve Their Job Satisfaction

Is your career as a physician becoming less satisfying?  Ranked as one of the most trusted professions, some doctors today are not feeling the…

What You Should Know About Physician Compensation

What You Should Know About Physician Compensation

Physician salaries are increasing at a slower pace. According to the AMGA, 2017 was the first year that physician compensation increased by less than 2% in…

Start Your Job Search

Click the Search Jobs button to browse our current openings.

Why Relationships and Workplace Culture Matter to Physicians

By

Much has been written about the rising prevalence of burnout among today’s physicians, with estimates approaching up to 70% feeling the effects.  Unfortunately, when approaches on how to improve physician wellness and reduce burnout are addressed, they are usually centered upon self-care, practicing mindfulness, self-awareness and other strategies that place much of the burden on the physician themselves.  Organizations and administrators who are placing the burnout burden right back on the shoulders of their own physicians are losing sight of a much larger issue.

Physician wellness is directly impacted by workplace culture.  That is not to discount other underlying factors, including work hours, patient loads, and administrative burdens, lack of autonomy, excessive bureaucracy, and other frustrations.  What hospital administrators and executives might be overlooking is the fact that one of the top reasons physicians leave a job is a lack of cultural fit and not compensation.  Gallup reported a direct link between staff understanding an organization’s purpose and culture and the achievement of quality healthcare.

Physicians, like most people who have spent their life building a career, want a sense of fulfillment and personal accomplishment.  And, to achieve that holistically, it needs to encompass more than the patient-facing aspect of their professional life.  When they, like any employee, feels engaged in their work for an organization that espouses values similar to their own, they are happier and less likely to suffer from negative stressors.  A recent Mayo Clinic White Paper on Executive Leadership and Physician Well-being outlined nine strategies to promote physician engagement and reduce burnout.  Among the findings included organizational leaders having to acknowledge that there is a problem.  A Jackson Physician Search survey showed that administrators believe their physicians are much more in alignment with the organization than the physicians are in reality.  One consideration in finding out if there is a gap between belief and reality is through improved communication with staff at all levels.  Others rely on annual surveys to get the feedback they need to take appropriate actions.

Another strategy identified by the Mayo Clinic paper recommends cultivating community in the workplace. This goes further than celebrating achievements and having pot luck luncheons.  More importantly, it is fostering the unique relationships that physicians have with their colleagues. In the past, a physician’s lounge was a place where doctors would go to discuss shared experiences, develop interpersonal connections, and seek and provide critical peer support.  Today’s focus on productivity requirements, administrative burdens, and other clerical demands have contributed to the erosion of these collegial relationships and can lead to feelings of frustration and isolation for the physicians.

Strengthening values and culture is a strategy that most health care organizations, until recently, have not given the weight of importance that it deserves.  In most healthcare-related organizations, the mission statement speaks to serving patients and providing compassionate, quality care.  What’s often missing is that to achieve that mission, an organization’s culture, values, and principles must be in alignment, thereby creating the foundation for achievement.

Other strategies to promote physician engagement, as discussed in the Mayo Clinic report, include the promotion of flexibility and work-life integration, providing the resources for self-care, and facilitating organizational studies to research new approaches supporting their physician team.

To see all nine strategies for physician well-being from the Mayo Clinic report, click here.

To learn more about how culture, values, and fit matter when filling your physician or advanced practice vacancies, contact the industry experts at Jackson Physician Search today.

 

How Culture Affects Physician Retention

Culture and Physician Retention

Imagine a workplace where medical professionals at all levels are highly respectful. Too many hospitals today are losing…

Physician Burnout and Cultural Fit

The Link Between Physician Burnout and Cultural Fit

Physicians today are suffering the effects of burnout at higher rates than ever before.  If someone were to…

Need Help Recruiting Physicians?

Click the Get Started button if you’re ready to speak with one of our physician recruitment experts.

How Smart Recruitment Helped An FQHC Expand Services

By

The state of Healthcare for FQHCs and Rural Communities

According to data published by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC), the U.S. will have a projected shortage of physicians that could reach over 120,000 by the end of the next decade.  Especially hard hit are rural communities, served by Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs), which are dealing with primary care shortages and also a lack of resources to address other healthcare needs.  In communities throughout the U.S., healthcare providers are struggling with an increased demand for behavioral, mental health and addiction treatment services.  In rural America, the problem is compounded because FQHCs are often relying on family practice physicians to provide these expanded services to the community.

In 2000, Congress passed the Drug Addiction Treatment Act, known as DATA 2000, allowing physicians to prescribe FDA-approved medications for the treatment of addiction and other mental health needs. Originally, DATA 2000 was enacted with restrictions limiting the number of patients a family care practitioner can treat at one time under the plan.  As the mental and behavioral health needs of the community grow, practitioners at FQHCs are applying for waivers that expand the number of patients they can treat under DATA 2000.

This scenario serves to illustrate how critical it is for FQHCs in rural communities to effectively recruit and retain primary care physicians who not only have the skills but are willing to earn the certifications necessary to meet the behavioral and mental health needs of their communities. Today, according to the National Association of Community Health Centers, almost 70% of Health Centers have a physician vacancy.

How one Rural FQHC Expanded Services and Access to Care

In many communities, the local health center is the sole healthcare provider available to the residents who live there.  FQHCs operate under federal funding and often rely on grants and other creative funding sources for recruitment purposes and expansion of services when needed.  Recently, an FQHC located in rural Vermont was dealing with a primary care vacancy at the same time they were trying to expand their mental health services offering.  Because of the length of time needed to fill vacancies in the past, they turned to Jackson Physician Search for help in meeting the stringent timeline associated with a federal grant they had received.  The grant funding was set to expire within a few months leading the FQHC to find a recruitment partner with national reach and a proven success rate.  Their requirement called for a family care physician who had experience treating all age groups and would also be willing and able to meet the certification requirements for a DATA 2000 waiver.  The waiver was a critical component of the FQHCs expansion of services for the growing mental and behavioral health needs of their community.  Ultimately, JPS presented a successful candidate that met the family practice requirements, was open to an accelerated relocation process, and will have the DATA 2000 waiver certification completed within the time required.

The above recruitment story is all too familiar to many FQHC Administrators.  As the primary care shortage continues impacting the healthcare industry, health centers will be navigating these challenges while finding new ways to serve their communities.

If your organization has a physician recruitment need, contact the professionals at Jackson Physician Search to find out how we can help.

Physician Recruitment Issues Affecting FQHC

What to Do About the Biggest Physician Recruitment Issues Affecting FQHC’s in 2019

As physician recruitment becomes even more competitive each year, Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHC) are feeling the brunt of the challenges. Jackson Physician Search…

Extreme Physician Shortage

What You Should Know About Physician Recruitment ROI

The combination of the current workforce shortage and an ineffective recruitment strategy can be costly to your organization and the community. The physician shortage…

Need Help Recruiting Physicians?

Click the Get Started button if you’re ready to speak with one of our physician recruitment experts.

2019 Hiring Outlook for Residents

By

If 2019 is your last year of residency, you are probably in the full-on throes of securing your first job post-residency!  While it can be a stressful time, it is also an opportunity to solidify the notion of getting your physician career off to a successful start.  Since 2019 will be spent exploring opportunities, let’s take a look at what is in store for Residents this year.

The good news is that you chose a career that is in high demand and will be for the foreseeable future.  In 2018, physician jobs grew by 7% compared to 5.1% in 2017.  As the national economy continues to grow, more people will be in the workforce, presumably leading to more individuals having company provided healthcare.  Here are several things to consider when exploring your post-residency job opportunities.

Geography Matters.  As it does in real estate, location can play a large part in deciding on your first job.  Those who are flexible in where they settle down will have greater choice and opportunities.  For example, while physician job postings across the board grew significantly in 2018, the overall demand was highly dependent upon geography. Growth was highest in areas like Tucson (20%), Los Angeles and Chicago (19%), Little Rock, Arkansas (18%), and Baltimore (17%).

Consider going country.  Many young physicians are drawn to large urban areas with the idea that it is where they will earn the most money.  While true in many cases, it also comes with its share of cautionary tales.  Large urban practices are not for everybody, and some young doctors can get lost in the shuffle.  An alternative may be to practice in a rural setting where you may have an opportunity to begin your career with better work/life balance.  Practicing in a smaller community setting gives you a sense of stature, and forces you to utilize all of your skills (and develop new ones).  Plus, compensation concerns are not the issue they were in the past.

Do your homework.  Because of the demand market, there is no need to jump at the first opportunity you are presented with during your job search.  Instead, treat each opportunity as you would a puzzling medical condition. Avoid jumping right in with a decision and do some homework on the organization. How stable is their leadership team, do they have a solid strategic plan for addressing the rapidly changing healthcare landscape?  If it is a smaller physician practice, what is their rate of turnover, are any key players planning to leave or retire? Understanding the business is just as important as the nuts and bolts of any offers they are presenting.

Culture and fit matters.  As important as it is for you to understand the organization as a business, it is equally important to understand its workplace culture.  The interview process is a good place to assess the culture of a potential work environment.  Spend some time in the coffee shop or cafeteria and strike up a conversation with some of the physicians or residents you meet. If it is an opportunity out of state or in a location you are unfamiliar with, spend time in the community, and visit the chamber of commerce to learn about recreational and cultural activities.  All of this matters if you want to set yourself up for making the right decision.

Only you can determine the best “first” job for your career as a physician.  It takes introspection to determine what type of practice setting is going to be your best opportunity for success. No physician wants to jump into what they thought was the perfect opportunity, only to find themselves exhausted, disillusioned, and back out on a new job search within a few short years.

If you are looking for a career partner that can help you navigate the process of finding a successful opportunity post-residency, Jackson Physician Search has an experienced team of recruitment professionals and a nationwide network of relationships to help you find your best fit. Contact us today.

What You Should Know About Physician Compensation

What You Should Know About Physician Compensation

Physician salaries are increasing at a slower pace. According to the AMGA, 2017 was the first year that physician compensation increased by less than 2%…

Physician Recruiter and Team

How to Ignite Your Career with a Physician Recruiter

Not every job search is created equal.  For many professions, a job search can be as comprehensive as visiting a job board…

Start Your Job Search

Click the Search Jobs button to browse our current openings.

How Millennial Doctors are Changing the Recruitment Landscape

By

In the United States, it has been a long-held practice to attribute generational monikers to individuals based on the year of their birth.  If we look at that breakdown, it makes sense to see that the number of physicians is relative to the population of the generational mix.  For example, in the U.S., 76 million people were born between 1946 and 1964, these baby boomers also represent the largest numbers of practicing physicians.  Studies show that over 40% of the nation’s physicians are over age 56.  The second largest generational mix are the millennials, with 62 million born between 1981 and 1996.  As the Boomer generation ages and retires, the Millennials are increasingly representing a greater proportion of physicians in the U.S., and there is a good reason why that matters with regard to recruitment.  Let’s look at how recruiting millennial physicians is different than past generations.

Digital Recruitment is Key

Unlike other generations, millennials grew up in the technology boom.  Doctors born in the millennial era are going to be more reliant on and more accessible through technology than their Gen-x or Baby Boomer counterparts.  Because they are so connected through their smartphones, laptops, and other tech gadgetry, your utilization of a smart digital recruitment strategy will keep you ahead of the curve.

It’s Not Always About Money

Of course, millennials worked hard in school and want to be fairly compensated for the work they are doing, but recruiting them will not be solely based on a dollar amount in their paycheck.  While they are sometimes inaccurately maligned by older generations as not being committed, or lacking drive, the truth is the opposite.  According to Deloitte’s 2018 Millennial Survey, over 50% of the respondents placed greater or as great a value on quality of life issues over the highest salary. Millennials are looking for more flexible schedules, guaranteed time off, and less time on call.  To recruit the millennial generation, work/life balance should play a prominent role in any job offers.

Don’t Overlook Culture and Fit

Much like millennials seeking greater work/life balance over annual salary, they also have strong opinions about how important it is for them to feel connected to the culture and values of their workplace. Millennials were raised in the era of participation trophies where teamwork and affirmation were valued above individual success. They are looking for the same in their work environment.  Millennial physicians are comfortable with the trend toward team-based care and are drawn to organizations that are aligned with their own personal values.

Focus on Retention

Because culture and fit are such vital factors in the millennial physician’s job search, it is no surprise that it plays a significant role in physician retention. Older generations of physicians are prone to stay in a job for a decade or more, with little to no thought of leaving. The millennial generation of physicians will seek out new opportunities after only two or three years.  To combat this tendency, healthcare organizations are more focused on finding a physician that first fits their culture, and then they develop a strategic plan to retain them.  Successful retention strategies include affording them time to pursue research projects, or branch out into additional specialties, and pursue charitable endeavors.  They key is keeping your physicians excited and engaged and not giving them a reason to look for greener pastures.

If your organization needs to develop a digital recruitment and retention strategy, contact the industry experts at Jackson Physician Search today.

Guide to Strategic Digital Recruitment

Our Regional Vice President of Recruiting, Christen Wrensen, presented the Digital Recruitment Strategy Guide to members of the Texas Hospital Association at their 2019 annual conference.

Extreme Physician Shortage

What You Should Know About Physician Recruitment ROI

The combination of the current workforce shortage and an ineffective recruitment strategy can be costly to your organization and the community. The physician shortage means…

Need Help Recruiting Physicians?

Click the Get Started button if you’re ready to speak with one of our physician recruitment experts.

Finding Non-traditional Physician Opportunities with the Help of a Recruiter

By

In today’s hot physician job market, many physicians assume that when the time comes for a job search, it will seem like catching fish in a barrel.  While partly true because the demand far exceeds the supply of available physicians, many doctors are missing out on opportunities that only a recruiter can help them find.  One such recruiter story involves Board-certified General and Forensic Psychiatrist Dr. S.

Dr. S began working in correctional medicine in 2010, after his impressive educational studies at the University of Hawaii and Fellowships at Yale School of Medicine, and University of Florida. He chose to work in corrections because it provided him with a quicker path to becoming a U.S. citizen by working with an underserved population.  Dr. S’s wife is a Pharmacist, originally from the Orlando area, so after five years of working on-site at a correctional facility in Georgia, the family moved back to Florida.

In 2018, Irven Stacy, a physician recruitment professional with Jackson Physician Search, learned of a client with a very specific need to fill.  The organization needed a Forensic Psychiatrist to lead clinical trials for a pharmaceutical manufacturer.  The reason they were experiencing challenges finding the right candidate is that they needed someone who had experience treating diverse groups of patients from children through the elderly. After spending several months, convincing the client that he could help them find the perfect candidate for this non-traditional job opportunity, Irv landed the contract.

During this time, Dr. S was not actively looking for a new position, but he was open to considering offers that piqued his interests.  Irv utilized all of the tools at his disposal and found Dr. S.  He knew right away that he had found someone who had the unique skill set that the client needed.  In addition to psychiatry, the candidate needed General Practice skills to be able to determine which patients fit the criteria for the clinical trial.

Dr. S was intrigued by the uniqueness of the new opportunity.  He relished the thought of utilizing more of his medical skills and training and also working in a more traditional office setting.  When Irv presented Dr. S to the client after only a 30-day search, they were excited about his background, training, and accomplishments.  They ultimately brought him onboard with a plan to train him for the role of lead investigator.

“It is very rewarding for me to help bring these drugs to the market,” Dr. S explained.  “It gives me a sense of accomplishment, and it is also nice to be able to provide the clinical trial patients with free healthcare.”

This scenario serves as a prime example of why working with a trusted recruiter can be so beneficial to a physician looking for their own perfect career opportunity.  In the case of Dr. S, he may not have ever known about the opportunity, nor even know that a position existed that would allow him to combine his General Practice skills with his Forensic Psychiatry background.  For both client and candidate, this was a “win-win” for all involved.

Physician Bonuses and Benefits

Understanding Physician Bonuses and Benefits

Hospitals and health systems are finding other ways to compensate physicians than base salary. 

get your foot in the door

How a Recruiter Can Help You Get Your Foot in the Door

Dr. Iswanto Sucandy had an impressive background and was in the process of finishing up his…

Start Your Job Search

Click the Search Jobs button to browse our current openings.

Why SEARCH is the Key to Your Digital Recruitment Strategy

By

This is the final article in our two-part series on why a digital recruitment strategy is the key to a successful physician search. To review part one, click here.

Now that we have described why a digital recruitment strategy is so important, let’s take a deeper dive into what goes into a successful program.  When done effectively, it is your best resource for finding and engaging both passive and active job candidates.  Previously, we discussed using national job boards, targeted emails, specific and engaging social media activity, and Doximity to pinpoint the candidates who have the best chance of being a skill set and cultural match for your organization. A targeted outreach using a variety of sourcing mechanisms is your best opportunity to optimize your time and recruitment dollars.

As you are developing a strategic and effective protocol to successfully drive your digital recruiting activities, there is one word that provides the framework for all of your activities, SEARCH.  Let’s break it down further.

SEGMENT – In order to avoid inefficient and overused messaging, it is important to SEGMENT and skillfully target the physicians who have the best opportunity to both be interested in your messaging, but also be a strong candidate culturally and skill wise.

ENGAGE – The content that you are publishing online should be consistent with your brand and engaging to your network of physicians, their peers, and colleagues.

AUTHENTIC – Your content should convey a voice and a tone for your organization.  Staying true to that tone will serve to develop the authenticity of your communications. When done well, those who read and engage with your content will know who the author is intrinsically.

RELEVANT – Producing content just to have something out there is not an effective way of engaging with physician candidates.  Your content should be planned out and produced to be relevant to your audience’s interests and motivations.

CREDIBLE – As you and others in the organization work toward developing a network and building your organization’s digital presence, credibility is extremely important. Your organization should be relied upon as a trusted resource with messaging that exudes your commitment, values, and expertise.

HABIT – Keeping your content fresh, relevant, and engaging is not a once in a while proposition.  It is extremely important to build upon the gains you make by staying in the newsfeed of those you are interacting with. As your network grows, you are generating traffic and engagements that will pay off in the future.

Developing a successful digital recruitment strategy can be a daunting organizational undertaking, but it doesn’t have to be done alone.  There is never a reason to “reinvent the wheel” when you can rely on a trusted partner and resource that has a team of experts who already have a mastery of the digital recruitment landscape.  Contact Jackson Physician Search today to find out how we can help you take your recruitment efforts to the next level.

Physician Recruitment ROI

What You Should Know About Physician Recruitment ROI

The combination of the current workforce shortage and an ineffective recruitment strategy can be costly to your organization and the community. The physician shortage means that finding candidates takes time.

Digital Recruitment Strategy

A Digital Recruitment Strategy Can Solve Your Physician Recruitment Challenges

Is your organization finding it harder to recruit physicians to fill your vacancies?  Is the physician shortage costing your organization time and money due to turnover and…

Need Help Recruiting Physicians?

Click the Get Started button if you’re ready to speak with one of our physician recruitment experts.

A Digital Recruitment Strategy Can Solve Your Physician Recruitment Challenges

By

This is the first article in a two-part series on developing an effective digital recruitment strategy.

Is your organization finding it harder to recruit physicians to fill your vacancies?  Is the physician shortage costing your organization time and money due to turnover and hard-to-fill specialties?  If so, then it is time to modernize your physician recruitment strategy by going digital.  Increasing your social and digital marketing has become a critical component of any successful recruitment plan because it allows you to reach and engage the most physicians.

Let’s examine why a digital recruitment strategy works in today’s physician jobs market.

Only 11% of physicians are actively looking for a new job, and those will be the candidates that every recruiter is targeting.  The key demographic is the 76% of physicians who are receptive to new opportunities but are NOT proactively searching.  Finding out who these physicians are and how you can engage with them may not be as difficult as it seems because each of these potential candidates are active on social and digital media sites.

These passive candidates can be targeted and engaged with on sites like LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and Doximity.  A smart digital recruitment strategy may include sponsored ads on these social channels and be uniquely targeted using specific characteristics like specialty, behavioral metrics, and even demographics.  If you need further convincing, consider that 94% of all physicians use their smartphones for professional reasons, while 87% between ages 26 to 55 are using social media.

Components of a Successful Digital Recruitment Strategy

Now that you have a clear understanding of why you need a digital recruitment strategy let’s get into what it entails. A digital recruitment strategy is more than periodically posting content on social media sites.  To use social and digital media effectively, you need to invest in several key components.

Things you need to BUY

Creating a digital recruiting strategy is a major investment. Since we know that most physicians are using their smartphones for their personal and professional life, your website should be optimized for mobile viewing.  We also know that 91% of physicians prefer to receive job opportunities via email, making an Email Marketing System a wise investment.  Investing in subscriptions to several top job boards will also help you reach more physician candidates.

Things you need to TEACH

An important part of your digital recruitment strategy is understanding how to create and enhance your digital networking. Having key team members learn more about how they can expand their digital footprint also serves to build your organization’s brand. It is also critical that your team utilize effective communication techniques to ensure that your messaging and content is consistent and engaging. There is no shortage of communication experts who can provide your team with the best practices and keys to more effective communications.

Things you need to BUILD

 As you learn more about effective communications in a digital landscape, you can utilize that knowledge to build more effective and engaging job ads.  Passive candidates need a reason to “click through” to learn more about an opportunity. Another important component to work on is growing your social media network and your digital presence. Your organizational brand and corporate values should play a prominent role in your digital presence enabling you to connect with physicians who are in alignment with those values and are predisposed to being a cultural fit.

Obviously, developing an effective digital recruitment strategy contains a lot of up-front costs and will require some key decisions to prioritize what you can invest in and when.  In the next article on developing a digital recruitment strategy, we will take an in-depth look at candidate sourcing and effective digital recruiting activities that you can put into practice immediately.

For more information about developing a digital recruitment strategy or to secure a recruitment partner that understands the digital landscape, contact Jackson Physician Search today.

Physician Recruitment ROI

What You Should Know About Physician Recruitment ROI

The combination of the current workforce shortage and an ineffective recruitment strategy can be costly to your organization and the community. 

strategic physician recruitment

[Recruitment Guide] Guide to Developing a Strategic Physician Recruitment Plan

This is Part 1 of our complete Guide to Physician Recruitment. With any process, it is best to start by assessing your unique needs and developing your strategy. This handbook helps…

Need Help Recruiting Physicians?

Click the Get Started button if you’re ready to speak with one of our physician recruitment experts.

Understanding Physician Bonuses and Benefits

By

Physician salaries continue to rise, although more modestly than in years past. You may find that hard to believe considering the 24-7 handwringing over the physician shortage, but have no doubt that physician compensation is still rising and becoming more complex.  After all, it is simple economics, as demand rises and supply stays the same or fails to rise commensurately, the cost (in this case salary) is going to rise.  For example, according to Medscape’s Physician Compensation Report 2018 average salaries for Primary Care and Specialties rose between 3 and 5% from 2017.  Hospitals and health systems are finding other ways to compensate physicians than base salary.  Many bonuses and benefits are not available everywhere but are often based on setting and geographic area.  Let’s try and make sense of some of the more popular physician bonuses and benefits.

Guaranteed Salary

This is one piece of your compensation package that is helpful to have your lawyer examine. Depending on your contract, this may be a 100% guarantee that you will earn X annually, or there may be a lower annual guarantee that includes incentive triggers that when met will increase your overall compensation. When incentives are involved, you will want to understand RVU’s and how they are tied to your salary.

Sign-On Bonus

The competition for physicians across the spectrum of care has led to an increase in the prevalence and amount of sign-on bonuses.  Depending on geographic location, physicians may be seeing signing bonuses up to $40,000. On the flip side of that, some regions are only offering bonuses up to $7,000.  Where you are willing to work can be financially beneficial.

Student Loan Forgiveness

An increasingly popular bonus being offered to new physicians is student loan forgiveness in return for a commitment to a contractual length of stay in the position. Once, a mainstay of rural and community health recruiting, the fierce competition for physician’s services have made student loan forgiveness a major attraction in the recruitment process.

Malpractice/Liability insurance

Insurance to protect physicians against malpractice claims is the most frequently provided benefit. This is another benefit that you should have your lawyer review to ensure that you understand coverage limits, statutes of limitations upon your leaving the position, and other details.

Relocation Stipend

Another popular benefit to consider is the relocation benefit.  Relocation stipends can generally be negotiated depending on the geographic area and individual circumstances. In these cases, it is important to fully understand what the requirements are to earn the stipend and how it will be paid out.

Retention Bonus

Because of the rising costs associated with physician vacancies and recruitment, retention bonuses are becoming a popular addition to the physician compensation package.  This bonus can be paid incrementally throughout the length of the employment contract or in some cases upon completion of the contract.

Other bonuses and stipends can be available but are less common.  In some geographic locations, physicians may be offered with a vehicle stipend, housing allowance, parking stipends, and more depending on specific challenges that one might find in a certain area.  These aren’t as common as some other incentives you can find, but if you are working with a good recruiter, they can alert you to many of the available perks.

To learn more about physician compensation or to work with a career partner who can assist you in finding the right opportunity to match your skills and career goals, contact Jackson Physician Search today.

Physician Career on Fire

Is Your Physician Career on FIRE?

Not in the literal sense, but many physicians today are working to ensure that their career is on FIRE.  FIRE as in Financial Independence, Retire Early!  The acronym stands for something that many of us…

Keeping up with the Dr. Joneses… and Other Ways to Sabotage Your Physician Job Search

As an in-demand physician, the chances are pretty good that you have plenty of opportunities to consider when and if you are in the market for a new practice opportunity.  There is much…

Start Your Job Search

Click the Search Jobs button to browse our current openings.

Overcoming the Extreme Physician Shortage in 2019

By

For several years now, healthcare industry thought leaders have been telling us that there was a looming physician shortage on the horizon.  Initially, it was reported that primary care was going to be the hardest hit because of an aging baby boomer population, an influx of newly covered patients through the Affordable Care Act, and the fact that over 30% of active physicians will be 65 or older by the year 2030. The initial primary and urgent care perspective still rings true. However, the physician shortage is actually impacting specialties across the spectrum of care.

According to Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) research data, the primary care shortage can be as many as 43,100 by the year 2030, while non-primary care specialties may experience a shortfall of up to 61,000 physicians.  Within those numbers, certain specialties, such as emergency medicine, neurology, psychiatry, anesthesiology, and others may experience a shortage of between 18,600 and 31,800 by the year 2030.

As concerning as the data is currently, it may actually get worse before it gets better. There is a large segment of our population that remains underserved.  According to AAMC data, as barriers to utilization are lifted through health law changes, more non-insured Americans are accessing health care.  Studies show that if all Americans accessed health care at the same levels as those who have typical employer-sponsored health care, we would need close to 100,000 additional physicians to provide their care.

There are no easy solutions to resolve the physician shortage crisis, but here are a few things worth keeping an eye on throughout the rest of 2019.

Increase residency programs.  Medical schools have taken steps to increase class sizes, yet the federal bureaucracy hasn’t increased support for residency programs commensurately.  The AAMC is calling on lawmakers to increase residency slots by an additional 3,000 annually for five years to support an increase in practicing physicians.

Streamline licensing process for international medical school graduates.  Did you know that almost 25% of today’s physician workforce are international medical graduates? Studies show that while these international graduates provide care on par or better than U.S. trained doctors, they face a cumbersome and complex licensure process to practice here. Further, they are required to complete redundant training programs here in the U.S. before licensure. At the risk of oversimplification, lawmakers and healthcare industry leaders should be able to resolve this by promoting legislation that simplifies the process.

Rising salaries and creative compensation.  Since 2013, salaries for Primary Care physicians have risen 10%, and in many cases more based on geographic location.  Because competition for physician services is so fierce, healthcare organizations are finding new and creative ways to entice candidates to their vacancies.  Signing bonuses and tuition repayment is one way that physicians are making more money, but other enticements include flexible scheduling, reduction or elimination of “call,” and much more.  Facilities in rural and underserved areas are feeling the recruitment crunch because the enticements they used to be able to offer exclusively, are now becoming commonplace.

Balancing non-physician utilization and technology.  Most organizations have focused their physician shortage efforts on developing a greater reliance on non-physicians.  Nurse practitioners, physician assistants and locum tenens are all being used in greater numbers to fill workforce vacancies. Additionally, technologic innovations can also serve to increase access to care and increase the efficiency of monitoring and managing a chronic condition. Mobile health technology and the utilization of biometric sensors are increasingly more popular among individuals who are interested in being more involved in their healthcare.

Jackson Physician Search can help your organization address both short- and long-term physician shortage strategies.  Our recruitment professionals have decades of industry experience, and our thought leadership can provide you with proven strategies to improve your physician recruitment and retention programs.  Contact us today to learn more.

Benchmarking Your Recruitment Tactics

Benchmarking to Improve Your Recruitment Process

This is the second in an ongoing series summarizing the findings in a recent white paper published by the President of Jackson Physician Search, Tony Stajduhar. To read “Physician Recruitment: The…

Create a Cultural Blueprint for Successful Physician Recruitment

How to Create a Cultural Blueprint for Successful Physician Recruitment

Culture is defined as “values, beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors that employees share and exhibit on a daily basis in their work and in the community”. And, lack of cultural fit is among the top…

Start Your Job Search

Click the Search Jobs button to browse our current openings.