Working With a Recruiter to Make a Change

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Based in Boise, Dr. M. had been traveling all over Idaho and other western states as the Medical Director for a correctional facility conglomerate.  The hours and the travel were taking a toll, and on top of that, Dr. M. and his wife had a newborn at home.  He saw the posting for a rural medical center position and knew he had to pursue the opportunity.

As is often the case with many small rural communities, the magic of living there is completely unknown unless you have visited or passed through at some point.  This was true for a small town of 990 people in rural Idaho, located near the “Craters of the Moon” National Monument and about 3 hours outside of Boise. The town, most noted for being the first in America to be lit by atomic energy is also famous because esteemed writer Ernest Hemingway occasionally brought his friends here to go hunting and fly fishing.

The people in this friendly town have their medical needs served by a single community medical center which also provides care to several surrounding towns. When their current Chief of Medical Staff decided to leave, it became a bit of concern for the entire community. After all, he was the only full-time Family Practice physician at the facility with other family practice doctors out of Boise rotating through part-time.

Jackson Physician Search recruiter Becky Casias knew that she had to find the right physician who could take over as Chief of Medical Staff and manage the Nurse Practitioners and the few specialty physicians that were practicing in the medical center.  In the job posting that she put out, Becky highlighted all of the benefits of living in the charming community.

As fate would have it, Dr. M. knew all about this quaint town and had visited there with a longtime friend who lived within a short drive in a nearby town. They had taken trips to hunt and fish in Mackay, a community of 700 that was also served by the medical center.  Dr. M., a military veteran and pilot, came with a wide range of experiences including Flight surgeon. Becky and Dr. M. agreed that they should move forward with the process.

Once that decision was made, things happened rather quickly. Dr. M’s contract with the prison system was up for renewal, so he didn’t have any entanglements to delay his pursuing the new opportunity.  Dr. M. met with the CEO of the medical center, the staff, and several community leaders.  From the beginning, it was very apparent that Dr. M. was the perfect fit for both the hospital and the community.

Jackson Physician Search has dozens of similar opportunities in both large and small communities across the United States.  Let our team of recruitment professionals guide you to the perfect fit for your career and for your family.  Reach out today to secure your tomorrow.

Finding Physician Opportunities

Finding Non-traditional Physician Opportunities with the Help of a Recruiter

In today’s hot physician job market, many physicians assume that when the time comes for a job search, it will seem like catching fish in a barrel.  While partly true because the demand far exceeds the supply of available physicians, many doctors are missing out on opportunities that only a recruiter can help them find.

What You Should Know About Physician Compensation

What You Should Know About Physician Compensation

Different physician employment models can have a significant impact on how a physician is compensated. If you’re like the 69% of physicians that are employed, then your compensation formula can look much different than a self-employed…

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Physicians and Mental Health Access in the United States

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According to the Journal of American Medical Association, nearly 1 in 5 people in the U.S. are afflicted with some form of mental health condition.  If this trend isn’t concerning enough, the Health Resources and Services Administration reported in 2016 that the supply of select behavioral health professionals is 250,000 short of what the nation’s demand will be by the year 2025.  Not surprisingly, as the situation worsens over time, primary care physicians will have to shoulder the burden.

Long waiting lists for mental health services are nothing new in many communities across the U.S., and the unfortunate aspect is that many of these patients are giving up on treatment rather than waiting.

“I often have a patient who clearly needs to see a psychiatrist, but is unable to get an appointment for another six months!” -Dr. G., New Jersey

In other instances where mental health access is available, insurance plans with notoriously low coverage options are making it difficult for patients to get the coverage they need.

One positive development, although it is also contributing to the demand for mental health services exceeding supply, is that awareness efforts nationwide are lessening the social stigmas attached to mental health issues.  Further, the clear relationship between mental health and physical health are changing both attitudes and approaches to healthcare delivery in clinics and practices nationwide.

One model in practice, referred to as SBIRT (Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment), originated through a 2009 North Carolina Medical Journal paper.1 Research from that paper identified that approximately 70% of all primary care visits could be attributed to behavioral or mental health issues.  If nothing else, these staggering numbers clearly demonstrate the need for additional mental health services training in the primary care setting, but also the necessary linkage to mental health providers and services.

A 2016 Ohio State University College of Medicine study 2 concluded that while mental health screenings are important in primary care settings, additional training and education for providers on mental health issues and medications is critical.  Additionally, providers need to be more cognizant of the community mental and behavioral health services that are available and to ensure they are maintaining those relationships to key services for their patients.

“Innovative ways of creating access to mental health services include telepsychiatry, where the psychiatric resource is brought to the patient, rather than the other way around.” -Dr. H., Wisconsin

In many rural communities, the availability of mental health services is often a multiple hour drive away.  In these circumstances, providers are relying on technology to create accessibility to services. The utilization of telemedicine technology provides a platform for mental health care providers to evaluate, treat, and manage medications for their patient at a distance. Integrating that care in consult with the primary care physician or family practitioner allows them to work together and achieve better results.

As with every challenge that ultimately crops up within the healthcare industry, the solutions require multi-faceted approaches that are supported from the federal level on down through the state and local level. In many cases, the best solutions will originate at the local level and work up as opposed to down from the federal government.  At the federal level, legislators need to create more incentives for healthcare professionals to follow a mental health services tract, insurance companies must reinforce their subscriber’s ability to seek treatment by providing the coverage necessary and also to reimburse at appropriate levels. Locally, community leaders, physicians, and educators need to foster the linkage between physical care providers and mental health providers ensuring that those individuals that need treatment are referred consistently to the appropriate entity where they can receive the help they need.

 

1 Collins, Chris, North Carolina Medical Journal, “Integrating Behavioral and Mental Health Services into the Primary Care Setting”, 2009.
2 Murray, Kelsey, Ohio State University College of Medicine, “A Survey of Mental Health Needs in a Primary Care Setting”, 2016

 

reducing paper to help combat physician burnout

Reducing Paperwork to Help Combat Physician Burnout

In January, Medscape released the results of their 2019 National Physician Burnout, Depression & Suicide Report.  This comprehensive report collected information from 15,000 physicians in 29 different…

Physician Bonuses and Benefits

Understanding Physician Bonuses and Benefits

Physician salaries continue to rise, although more modestly than in years past. You may find that hard to believe considering the 24-7 handwringing over…

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Mental Health Access: By the Numbers

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The well-discussed physician shortage is affecting healthcare across the country and across specialties.  But, when it comes to mental health professionals, the numbers look even worse.  For context, the Health Resources and Services Administration states that 55.3 million Americans live in a federally designated primary care shortage area, while an astonishing 89.3 million live in a similarly designated mental health professional shortage area.  Those numbers, worrisome enough on their own, are even more concerning when you consider rural areas. Even though urban clinics often have long waiting lists for mental health providers, rural clinics often have no mental health provider at all.

According to Mental Health America, although there has been a slight decrease in the number of adults who have a mental health condition from 2015 to today, there are still 44 million adults suffering from a mental health condition.  Conversely, the number of youth experiencing a mental health condition has increased in the past four years.  Data shows that 3.1 million youth (ages 12 – 17) have suffered from at least one major depressive event in the past year, and another 1.1 million are suffering from a substance use disorder. Nationally, only 25% of youth with severe depression receive some form of consistent treatment. Barriers to youth treatment include late recognition in primary care settings and limited coverage of mental health services.

Improving Access to Mental Health Care Services

More than half of those who experience some form of mental illness in a year do not, or in many cases cannot get treatment.  Clearly, whether it is a lack of providers, insurance, or general confusion about how to get the necessary treatment, far too many individuals are not getting the help they need. Here are a few initiatives that may help improve access to mental health care services.

  1. Primary Care Integration – Even in underserved communities, most individuals have access to a primary care physician. The American Psychiatric Association (APA) is supportive of building up capacity for mental health care through additional screening in the primary care setting and flagging patients who need further evaluation by a mental health provider. Many primary care offices are filling the gap with Physician Assistants with mental health specialization. Known as ‘Collaborative Care,’ having access to these front-line providers means additional screening, the implementation of initial treatment plans, and the ability to perform consultation and referral services when necessary.
  2. Technology – Never to be mistaken for replacing a practitioner, new technologies can be used to expand the reach of existing mental health providers. Video conferencing is being used to overcome the lack of access in underserved communities. Another effective use of technology is the utilization of software-based cognitive behavioral therapy where trial results are demonstrating it as a promising option to in-person therapy.
  3. Legislative Initiatives – The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) are encouraging states to create innovative payment methodologies for telemedicine. Evidence exists that shows telemedicine not being reimbursed or reimbursed at a lower level which discourages mental health providers from expanding their services through telemedicine technology. Other legislative opportunities include revising licensure requirements allowing mental health providers to provide services, including telemedicine services, across state lines. Eighteen states have adopted the Federation of State Medical Boards’ compact which expedites licensure for out of state physicians, including psychiatrists. Similar multistate compacts for other mental health professionals are in the early stages of development.

The results of 37 randomized studies published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), confirmed that collaborative care is effective in improving short-term outcomes and includes evidence of longer-term benefits.  The collaborative care interventions that were included in the JAMA study included a wide range of approaches from face-to-face evaluations to telephone interviews to video conferencing.

Healthcare administrators faced with making critical decisions in providing a broad spectrum of care in the most cost-effective manner will continue considering whether a collaborative care model is appropriate for their system. Data highlighted in an article published by the National Institutes of Health showed that 69% of patients with depression only present physical ailments during their primary care visit. Another study concluded that the higher the number of physical symptoms reported the greater the likelihood of the patient having an underlying mood disorder.

Above all else, mental health care systems are going to continue changing in the face of expanding mental health needs. The opioid crisis is stretching addiction treatment providers to the limit while growing depression and anxiety disorders in our nation’s youth are forcing care systems to develop innovative ways to improve access and reduce the stigmas of mental health care. Currently, there is no consensus on the most effective configuration for a collaborative care approach to meet the mental health needs of a community. In many cases, where it is fiscally viable, additional psychiatric staff in tandem with primary care providers may be the appropriate answer, while in other situations, integrating technologies may be an effective way to expand mental health access.

Rural Primary Care Physician

How Smart Recruitment Helped An FQHC Expand Services

The state of Healthcare for FQHCs and Rural Communities According to data published by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC), the U.S. will have a projected shortage of physicians that…

Digital Recruitment Strategy

A Digital Recruitment Strategy Can Solve Your Physician Recruitment Challenges

This is the first article in a two-part series on developing an effective digital recruitment strategy. Is your organization finding it harder to recruit physicians to fill your vacancies?  Is the physician shortage…

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Reducing Paperwork to Help Combat Physician Burnout

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In January, Medscape released the results of their 2019 National Physician Burnout, Depression & Suicide Report.  This comprehensive report collected information from 15,000 physicians in 29 different specialties.  While 44% of physician respondents reported feeling burned out, and another 15% reported being colloquially or clinically depressed, the driver behind these responses may surprise you. Almost 60% of respondents reported that they are burdened by too many bureaucratic tasks like charting and paperwork.  The next closest factor as identified in the survey was spending too many hours at work which came in at 34%.

Clearly, if physicians are telling us that working too many hours is contributing to their feelings of burnout, imagine how frustrating it would be to know that paperwork and bureaucracy is one of the leading reasons for your long work days. A study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine determined that for every hour a doctor is treating patients, they are spending two hours on paperwork! Burdensome clerical activity is even creeping into the time physicians are examining their patients as the study found that almost 37% of the face-to-face patient time is spent on electronic health records (EHR) and other clerical work.

Ways to reduce administrative burdens

If the results of these studies sound all too familiar, here are several ways you can alleviate some of that workload and free up more time to spend on patient care.

Get Involved – Believe it or not, health care industry leaders and federal agencies all realize that change is needed to allow physicians to spend more time focused on their patient and less on recordkeeping. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) is initiating changes to reduce the administrative burden on Physicians as part of its comprehensive “Patients over Paperwork” initiative. Physicians that have identified confusing and/or time consuming documentation are encouraged to report them to ReducingProviderBurden@cms.hhs.gov.

Share the Burden – Physicians at UCLA Health and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center are reducing the amount of time they spend on documentation through new virtual note-taking technology, Our Notes. Developed by OpenNotes, the concept promotes having the patients participate in the note-taking process in collaboration with the physician.  Research has shown that involving the patient in documenting the visit leads to increased patient engagement and improved communication between the physician and the patient.

Smart Glasses – Another exciting tech development that healthcare organizations are piloting involves Google’s Smart Glasses.  Recently relaunched, the Smart Glasses are set up to link with proprietary software, like Augmedix, a remote scribe service that records all of the clinical notes for the physician.  Clinicians who are using this technology report that the device is shaving as much as 30% from their administrative time which can be used for additional patients or improving their quality of life.

Whether through regulatory changes, technology, or even hiring additional support staff, like Medical Assistants, healthcare industry leaders realize that changes need to be made to support physicians.  More doctors are feeling the effects of burnout and reducing the amount of time they are spending on documentation and bureaucracy is one way to help them manage their work-related pressures.

If you are ready to explore new career opportunities or find an organization that is a better fit for you personally and professionally, contact a Jackson Physician Search recruitment professional today.  Our team has decades of industry experience and a nationwide reach to find you the best fit for the next step in your career.

 

Physicians Can Improve Their Job Satisfaction

Five Ways Physicians Can Improve Their Job Satisfaction

Is your career as a physician becoming less satisfying?  Ranked as one of the most trusted professions, some doctors today are not feeling the…

What You Should Know About Physician Compensation

What You Should Know About Physician Compensation

Physician salaries are increasing at a slower pace. According to the AMGA, 2017 was the first year that physician compensation increased by less than 2% in…

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Click the Search Jobs button to browse our current openings.

Why Relationships and Workplace Culture Matter to Physicians

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Much has been written about the rising prevalence of burnout among today’s physicians, with estimates approaching up to 70% feeling the effects.  Unfortunately, when approaches on how to improve physician wellness and reduce burnout are addressed, they are usually centered upon self-care, practicing mindfulness, self-awareness and other strategies that place much of the burden on the physician themselves.  Organizations and administrators who are placing the burnout burden right back on the shoulders of their own physicians are losing sight of a much larger issue.

Physician wellness is directly impacted by workplace culture.  That is not to discount other underlying factors, including work hours, patient loads, and administrative burdens, lack of autonomy, excessive bureaucracy, and other frustrations.  What hospital administrators and executives might be overlooking is the fact that one of the top reasons physicians leave a job is a lack of cultural fit and not compensation.  Gallup reported a direct link between staff understanding an organization’s purpose and culture and the achievement of quality healthcare.

Physicians, like most people who have spent their life building a career, want a sense of fulfillment and personal accomplishment.  And, to achieve that holistically, it needs to encompass more than the patient-facing aspect of their professional life.  When they, like any employee, feels engaged in their work for an organization that espouses values similar to their own, they are happier and less likely to suffer from negative stressors.  A recent Mayo Clinic White Paper on Executive Leadership and Physician Well-being outlined nine strategies to promote physician engagement and reduce burnout.  Among the findings included organizational leaders having to acknowledge that there is a problem.  A Jackson Physician Search survey showed that administrators believe their physicians are much more in alignment with the organization than the physicians are in reality.  One consideration in finding out if there is a gap between belief and reality is through improved communication with staff at all levels.  Others rely on annual surveys to get the feedback they need to take appropriate actions.

Another strategy identified by the Mayo Clinic paper recommends cultivating community in the workplace. This goes further than celebrating achievements and having pot luck luncheons.  More importantly, it is fostering the unique relationships that physicians have with their colleagues. In the past, a physician’s lounge was a place where doctors would go to discuss shared experiences, develop interpersonal connections, and seek and provide critical peer support.  Today’s focus on productivity requirements, administrative burdens, and other clerical demands have contributed to the erosion of these collegial relationships and can lead to feelings of frustration and isolation for the physicians.

Strengthening values and culture is a strategy that most health care organizations, until recently, have not given the weight of importance that it deserves.  In most healthcare-related organizations, the mission statement speaks to serving patients and providing compassionate, quality care.  What’s often missing is that to achieve that mission, an organization’s culture, values, and principles must be in alignment, thereby creating the foundation for achievement.

Other strategies to promote physician engagement, as discussed in the Mayo Clinic report, include the promotion of flexibility and work-life integration, providing the resources for self-care, and facilitating organizational studies to research new approaches supporting their physician team.

To see all nine strategies for physician well-being from the Mayo Clinic report, click here.

To learn more about how culture, values, and fit matter when filling your physician or advanced practice vacancies, contact the industry experts at Jackson Physician Search today.

 

How Culture Affects Physician Retention

Culture and Physician Retention

Imagine a workplace where medical professionals at all levels are highly respectful. Too many hospitals today are losing…

Physician Burnout and Cultural Fit

The Link Between Physician Burnout and Cultural Fit

Physicians today are suffering the effects of burnout at higher rates than ever before.  If someone were to…

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Announcement: Physician Recruitment ROI Calculator

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Do you know where your candidates are coming from and how much they cost you to find?

If your answer to either of those questions is negative, then you’ll want to check out the Jackson Physician Search ROI Calculator when it launches later this quarter. In today’s competitive environment, it is critical for healthcare facility administrators to understand how much return they are getting for each recruitment dollar spent. And even more importantly, how much the return could be if placements were made faster.

Using the JPS ROI Calculator, you can look at your recruiting dollars in new ways by learning how much it costs when your time-to-fill averages are lagging.  The ROI Calculator also illustrates, in real dollars, how much revenue is lost with each physician vacancy.  Check out the ROI Calculator when it launches, and give Jackson Physician Search a call to learn how we can help improve your ROI.

 

The True Cost of Physician Vacancies

The True Cost of Physician Vacancies

This article is the first in a series of content that reflects upon the findings in a recent white paper published by Tony Stajduhar, President, of Jackson Physician Search

Physician Recruitment ROI

What You Should Know About Physician Recruitment ROI

When it comes to Physician Recruitment ROI, there are three key concepts you should know. How to determine ROI, steps you can take to improve ROI, and the impact a physician recruitment partner can have on ROI.

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How Smart Recruitment Helped An FQHC Expand Services

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The state of Healthcare for FQHCs and Rural Communities

According to data published by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC), the U.S. will have a projected shortage of physicians that could reach over 120,000 by the end of the next decade.  Especially hard hit are rural communities, served by Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs), which are dealing with primary care shortages and also a lack of resources to address other healthcare needs.  In communities throughout the U.S., healthcare providers are struggling with an increased demand for behavioral, mental health and addiction treatment services.  In rural America, the problem is compounded because FQHCs are often relying on family practice physicians to provide these expanded services to the community.

In 2000, Congress passed the Drug Addiction Treatment Act, known as DATA 2000, allowing physicians to prescribe FDA-approved medications for the treatment of addiction and other mental health needs. Originally, DATA 2000 was enacted with restrictions limiting the number of patients a family care practitioner can treat at one time under the plan.  As the mental and behavioral health needs of the community grow, practitioners at FQHCs are applying for waivers that expand the number of patients they can treat under DATA 2000.

This scenario serves to illustrate how critical it is for FQHCs in rural communities to effectively recruit and retain primary care physicians who not only have the skills but are willing to earn the certifications necessary to meet the behavioral and mental health needs of their communities. Today, according to the National Association of Community Health Centers, almost 70% of Health Centers have a physician vacancy.

How one Rural FQHC Expanded Services and Access to Care

In many communities, the local health center is the sole healthcare provider available to the residents who live there.  FQHCs operate under federal funding and often rely on grants and other creative funding sources for recruitment purposes and expansion of services when needed.  Recently, an FQHC located in rural Vermont was dealing with a primary care vacancy at the same time they were trying to expand their mental health services offering.  Because of the length of time needed to fill vacancies in the past, they turned to Jackson Physician Search for help in meeting the stringent timeline associated with a federal grant they had received.  The grant funding was set to expire within a few months leading the FQHC to find a recruitment partner with national reach and a proven success rate.  Their requirement called for a family care physician who had experience treating all age groups and would also be willing and able to meet the certification requirements for a DATA 2000 waiver.  The waiver was a critical component of the FQHCs expansion of services for the growing mental and behavioral health needs of their community.  Ultimately, JPS presented a successful candidate that met the family practice requirements, was open to an accelerated relocation process, and will have the DATA 2000 waiver certification completed within the time required.

The above recruitment story is all too familiar to many FQHC Administrators.  As the primary care shortage continues impacting the healthcare industry, health centers will be navigating these challenges while finding new ways to serve their communities.

If your organization has a physician recruitment need, contact the professionals at Jackson Physician Search to find out how we can help.

Physician Recruitment Issues Affecting FQHC

What to Do About the Biggest Physician Recruitment Issues Affecting FQHC’s in 2019

As physician recruitment becomes even more competitive each year, Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHC) are feeling the brunt of the challenges. Jackson Physician Search…

Extreme Physician Shortage

What You Should Know About Physician Recruitment ROI

The combination of the current workforce shortage and an ineffective recruitment strategy can be costly to your organization and the community. The physician shortage…

Need Help Recruiting Physicians?

Click the Get Started button if you’re ready to speak with one of our physician recruitment experts.

2019 Hiring Outlook for Residents

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If 2019 is your last year of residency, you are probably in the full-on throes of securing your first job post-residency!  While it can be a stressful time, it is also an opportunity to solidify the notion of getting your physician career off to a successful start.  Since 2019 will be spent exploring opportunities, let’s take a look at what is in store for Residents this year.

The good news is that you chose a career that is in high demand and will be for the foreseeable future.  In 2018, physician jobs grew by 7% compared to 5.1% in 2017.  As the national economy continues to grow, more people will be in the workforce, presumably leading to more individuals having company provided healthcare.  Here are several things to consider when exploring your post-residency job opportunities.

Geography Matters.  As it does in real estate, location can play a large part in deciding on your first job.  Those who are flexible in where they settle down will have greater choice and opportunities.  For example, while physician job postings across the board grew significantly in 2018, the overall demand was highly dependent upon geography. Growth was highest in areas like Tucson (20%), Los Angeles and Chicago (19%), Little Rock, Arkansas (18%), and Baltimore (17%).

Consider going country.  Many young physicians are drawn to large urban areas with the idea that it is where they will earn the most money.  While true in many cases, it also comes with its share of cautionary tales.  Large urban practices are not for everybody, and some young doctors can get lost in the shuffle.  An alternative may be to practice in a rural setting where you may have an opportunity to begin your career with better work/life balance.  Practicing in a smaller community setting gives you a sense of stature, and forces you to utilize all of your skills (and develop new ones).  Plus, compensation concerns are not the issue they were in the past.

Do your homework.  Because of the demand market, there is no need to jump at the first opportunity you are presented with during your job search.  Instead, treat each opportunity as you would a puzzling medical condition. Avoid jumping right in with a decision and do some homework on the organization. How stable is their leadership team, do they have a solid strategic plan for addressing the rapidly changing healthcare landscape?  If it is a smaller physician practice, what is their rate of turnover, are any key players planning to leave or retire? Understanding the business is just as important as the nuts and bolts of any offers they are presenting.

Culture and fit matters.  As important as it is for you to understand the organization as a business, it is equally important to understand its workplace culture.  The interview process is a good place to assess the culture of a potential work environment.  Spend some time in the coffee shop or cafeteria and strike up a conversation with some of the physicians or residents you meet. If it is an opportunity out of state or in a location you are unfamiliar with, spend time in the community, and visit the chamber of commerce to learn about recreational and cultural activities.  All of this matters if you want to set yourself up for making the right decision.

Only you can determine the best “first” job for your career as a physician.  It takes introspection to determine what type of practice setting is going to be your best opportunity for success. No physician wants to jump into what they thought was the perfect opportunity, only to find themselves exhausted, disillusioned, and back out on a new job search within a few short years.

If you are looking for a career partner that can help you navigate the process of finding a successful opportunity post-residency, Jackson Physician Search has an experienced team of recruitment professionals and a nationwide network of relationships to help you find your best fit. Contact us today.

What You Should Know About Physician Compensation

What You Should Know About Physician Compensation

Physician salaries are increasing at a slower pace. According to the AMGA, 2017 was the first year that physician compensation increased by less than 2%…

Physician Recruiter and Team

How to Ignite Your Career with a Physician Recruiter

Not every job search is created equal.  For many professions, a job search can be as comprehensive as visiting a job board…

Start Your Job Search

Click the Search Jobs button to browse our current openings.

How Millennial Doctors are Changing the Recruitment Landscape

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In the United States, it has been a long-held practice to attribute generational monikers to individuals based on the year of their birth.  If we look at that breakdown, it makes sense to see that the number of physicians is relative to the population of the generational mix.  For example, in the U.S., 76 million people were born between 1946 and 1964, these baby boomers also represent the largest numbers of practicing physicians.  Studies show that over 40% of the nation’s physicians are over age 56.  The second largest generational mix are the millennials, with 62 million born between 1981 and 1996.  As the Boomer generation ages and retires, the Millennials are increasingly representing a greater proportion of physicians in the U.S., and there is a good reason why that matters with regard to recruitment.  Let’s look at how recruiting millennial physicians is different than past generations.

Digital Recruitment is Key

Unlike other generations, millennials grew up in the technology boom.  Doctors born in the millennial era are going to be more reliant on and more accessible through technology than their Gen-x or Baby Boomer counterparts.  Because they are so connected through their smartphones, laptops, and other tech gadgetry, your utilization of a smart digital recruitment strategy will keep you ahead of the curve.

It’s Not Always About Money

Of course, millennials worked hard in school and want to be fairly compensated for the work they are doing, but recruiting them will not be solely based on a dollar amount in their paycheck.  While they are sometimes inaccurately maligned by older generations as not being committed, or lacking drive, the truth is the opposite.  According to Deloitte’s 2018 Millennial Survey, over 50% of the respondents placed greater or as great a value on quality of life issues over the highest salary. Millennials are looking for more flexible schedules, guaranteed time off, and less time on call.  To recruit the millennial generation, work/life balance should play a prominent role in any job offers.

Don’t Overlook Culture and Fit

Much like millennials seeking greater work/life balance over annual salary, they also have strong opinions about how important it is for them to feel connected to the culture and values of their workplace. Millennials were raised in the era of participation trophies where teamwork and affirmation were valued above individual success. They are looking for the same in their work environment.  Millennial physicians are comfortable with the trend toward team-based care and are drawn to organizations that are aligned with their own personal values.

Focus on Retention

Because culture and fit are such vital factors in the millennial physician’s job search, it is no surprise that it plays a significant role in physician retention. Older generations of physicians are prone to stay in a job for a decade or more, with little to no thought of leaving. The millennial generation of physicians will seek out new opportunities after only two or three years.  To combat this tendency, healthcare organizations are more focused on finding a physician that first fits their culture, and then they develop a strategic plan to retain them.  Successful retention strategies include affording them time to pursue research projects, or branch out into additional specialties, and pursue charitable endeavors.  They key is keeping your physicians excited and engaged and not giving them a reason to look for greener pastures.

If your organization needs to develop a digital recruitment and retention strategy, contact the industry experts at Jackson Physician Search today.

Guide to Strategic Digital Recruitment

Our Regional Vice President of Recruiting, Christen Wrensen, presented the Digital Recruitment Strategy Guide to members of the Texas Hospital Association at their 2019 annual conference.

Extreme Physician Shortage

What You Should Know About Physician Recruitment ROI

The combination of the current workforce shortage and an ineffective recruitment strategy can be costly to your organization and the community. The physician shortage means…

Need Help Recruiting Physicians?

Click the Get Started button if you’re ready to speak with one of our physician recruitment experts.

Finding Non-traditional Physician Opportunities with the Help of a Recruiter

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In today’s hot physician job market, many physicians assume that when the time comes for a job search, it will seem like catching fish in a barrel.  While partly true because the demand far exceeds the supply of available physicians, many doctors are missing out on opportunities that only a recruiter can help them find.  One such recruiter story involves Board-certified General and Forensic Psychiatrist Dr. S.

Dr. S began working in correctional medicine in 2010, after his impressive educational studies at the University of Hawaii and Fellowships at Yale School of Medicine, and University of Florida. He chose to work in corrections because it provided him with a quicker path to becoming a U.S. citizen by working with an underserved population.  Dr. S’s wife is a Pharmacist, originally from the Orlando area, so after five years of working on-site at a correctional facility in Georgia, the family moved back to Florida.

In 2018, Irven Stacy, a physician recruitment professional with Jackson Physician Search, learned of a client with a very specific need to fill.  The organization needed a Forensic Psychiatrist to lead clinical trials for a pharmaceutical manufacturer.  The reason they were experiencing challenges finding the right candidate is that they needed someone who had experience treating diverse groups of patients from children through the elderly. After spending several months, convincing the client that he could help them find the perfect candidate for this non-traditional job opportunity, Irv landed the contract.

During this time, Dr. S was not actively looking for a new position, but he was open to considering offers that piqued his interests.  Irv utilized all of the tools at his disposal and found Dr. S.  He knew right away that he had found someone who had the unique skill set that the client needed.  In addition to psychiatry, the candidate needed General Practice skills to be able to determine which patients fit the criteria for the clinical trial.

Dr. S was intrigued by the uniqueness of the new opportunity.  He relished the thought of utilizing more of his medical skills and training and also working in a more traditional office setting.  When Irv presented Dr. S to the client after only a 30-day search, they were excited about his background, training, and accomplishments.  They ultimately brought him onboard with a plan to train him for the role of lead investigator.

“It is very rewarding for me to help bring these drugs to the market,” Dr. S explained.  “It gives me a sense of accomplishment, and it is also nice to be able to provide the clinical trial patients with free healthcare.”

This scenario serves as a prime example of why working with a trusted recruiter can be so beneficial to a physician looking for their own perfect career opportunity.  In the case of Dr. S, he may not have ever known about the opportunity, nor even know that a position existed that would allow him to combine his General Practice skills with his Forensic Psychiatry background.  For both client and candidate, this was a “win-win” for all involved.

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