< Physician Recognition Archives - Jackson Physician Search

Focus On Culture To Build the Perfect Team

By

Are you having staffing issues and problems with turnover?  Does the cost of constantly recruiting physicians get brought up at every meeting?  If either of these situations sound familiar, your organization might have a culture problem. There is a growing amount of discussion regarding culture and fit, and how physicians today are placing more emphasis on finding a workplace that is aligned with their values.  The working professional’s website, LinkedIn, sponsored research into the role culture and fit play in workplace satisfaction and retention.

Do you know what is most important to your physician team?  If you are operating under dated assumptions, you would probably say it’s all about the money.  In today’s healthcare environment, physicians who are unhappy with their current situation have ample opportunities to move on and find a position with more control over their work/life balance and an environment that is consistent with their values. According to LinkedIn, 70% of professionals today would not work at a leading organization if it meant tolerating a bad workplace culture. If you think you can buy their happiness and loyalty, think again. An impressive 65% of survey respondents are willing to put up with lower pay if it means they can work in a better environment.

As you already know, physicians are suffering from burnout in record numbers. To stem the churn, administrators need to gain a better understanding of what type of culture exists currently, and what they envision for the future.  A good place to start is by reviewing a study conducted by Jackson Physician Search, The Engagement Gap. The results indicate a vast difference between what physicians believe about the workplace and what the executives believe. For example, less than 50% of physicians believe they are being treated fairly, while almost 70% of executives believe that their doctors are treated fairly.  In that same vein, only 48% of physicians feel they are always treated with respect, while 78% of executives feel that physicians are treated respectfully.  One area where doctors and administrators agree is that the majority of both groups admit that communication needs to be improved.

Once the culture and types of behaviors needed to support and foster a better work environment are understood, leadership must clearly communicate the message throughout the organization via words AND actions. None of this happens overnight in any workplace, but over time, tangible results are visible through improved performance, stronger physician engagement, and more successful recruitment and retention.

For more information about how Jackson Physician Search can help you find and retain qualified physicians and advanced practice professionals that fit within your culture and values, contact one of our experienced healthcare recruitment professionals today.

Significance of Doctor’s Day

By

The significance of Doctor’s Day is a chance to bring much-deserved attention to some of the wonderful physicians that we have had the pleasure of getting to know. We are proud to work with doctors every day knowing they’ll go on to make such a meaningful impact on the lives of the people around them. Join us in recognizing some of the incredible doctors we’ve worked with this year. From all of us at Jackson Physician Search, thank you for your dedication and care.

Dr. Henrique Fernandez has been practicing Gastroenterology for a decade. When asked what he finds most rewarding about his profession, he said, “When my patients come back for a follow-up visit, and they say that they feel much better, and they express that they were treated with dignity, respect, and professionalism.

 

Doctors help us with our health and well-being. They can cure us, give us advice on how to prevent disease, and help us manage our health. They are our best resource for living long and healthy lives. We are grateful for physicians around the world that labor diligently to heal our bodies, and very grateful for those that heal our minds.

Dr. George Melnyk has been a psychiatrist for 33 years and currently helps those suffering from addiction. He says, “The most rewarding aspect of being a physician is the expression of joy on a patient’s face after recovering from a very complicated illness. It is a very powerful and wonderful feeling, and at the same time, very humbling and moving.”

Dr. Vinay Sanghi has been practicing Cardiology with empathy and enthusiasm for close to two decades. He was asked what the best aspect of being a doctor is, and replied, “I love that I get to make people’s quality of life better.”

 

Doctors are an asset to any community. By contributing to the health and well-being of so many individuals within the community, they improve the entire community. They are the first to welcome new members. They are there in times of emergency. They help all generations thrive which generates strong, supportive communities.

Dr. Victoria Passov has been practicing Psychiatry for 13 years. To her, “The most rewarding thing about being a psychiatrist is to have the opportunity to hear people’s stories. The experience of being a part of their journey to better understand themselves is priceless!”

Dr. Inderjeet Kaur is a psychiatrist at a counseling and wellness center. When asked about her work, she said, “The most rewarding aspect of being a psychiatrist, for me, is the impact of seeing a patient arrive at the clinic, crying and emotionally labile, and then seeing them leave, smiling and feeling hopeful. Simply hearing a patient say, ‘Thank you for listening to me,’ is the greatest reward.”

 

Being a doctor is a monumental task. Getting through the education requirements alone is an achievement. A doctor’s lifelong dedication to knowledge and excellence is commendable. Many clinical settings, especially hospitals, are unlike a typical workplace. There is constant activity, and usually very high stakes.

Dr. Josephine Glaser has been practicing for 22 years a Family Medicine Physician. When asked about her career, she responded, “I love being a doctor. I love working with my medical team to promote life honoring patient-centered care in a crazy, hectic medical system.”

 

Each year, on March 30th, the nation recognizes the contribution of doctors to individual lives and the communities they are a part of. That day has special significance in medicine because it marks the anniversary of the first use of general anesthesia. Over 170 years ago, about 50 miles east of the Jackson Physician Search headquarters, in Jefferson, GA, Dr. Crawford Long successfully used ether to anesthetize his patient.

Dr. Dave Purcell is an anesthesiologist that has been practicing for 25 years. He says, “The most rewarding thing to me is knowing that someone, whether they are aware of it or not, has made a change for the better, in a lifesaving way, under my care and that of my team, and that they trusted me to do that!”

As Doctor’s Day approaches, take a moment to reflect on how doctors have made an impact on your life and reach out to let them know how much you appreciate them.

Admiring the Rockstars of Medicine on National Doctor’s Day

By

“I get to be a doctor!” That was the first, celebratory thought to enter Skyler Dahlseng’s mind when he recently learned the good news of his residency match. A fourth-year medical student at A.T. Still University, Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine in Missouri, Skyler joined some 30,000 other aspiring doctors who celebrated their match and the opportunity to contribute to the delivery of healthcare in communities across the United States.

Celebrating the contributions of doctors at every stage of their medical careers has been the goal of National Doctor’s Day, observed annually on March 30th. Doctor’s Day originated in 1933 and became an officially designated national day of observance through an act of by Congress signed by President George H.W. Bush in 1990. Today, the significance of Doctor’s Day is greater than ever. Meeting the needs of patients is the bedrock of a healthy community, and it depends on the motivation, enthusiasm and tireless dedication of both upcoming doctors and practicing physicians.

Doctor’s Day reminds everyone of the importance of intangible motivators for physicians, as reflected in Skylar’s experience in matching with a residency. The attitudes of the physicians and “general vibe” of a program ranked in his top three criteria for choosing a residency, along with tangibles, such as proximity to family and the reputation of program.

“If the people who were going to be my colleagues were still excited about learning the practice of medicine, and had a smile on their face when I introduced myself, I left with a much better impression of the program,” Sklyer said.

Making a Difference Motivates Physicians

Seneca Healthcare, a very small hospital in the rural national forests of northern California was in desperate need of another physician for a clinical practice and to cover the emergency department. “Dr. Suarez – an amazing, bright and kind gentleman who was running a family medicine residency in Miami – was ready to leave the city and academia to make a difference in a community and have a better lifestyle for his family,” according to Peter Cebulka, Director of Recruiting.

After a cross-country move, Dr. Suarez is now living in a beautiful new lake home and loves the people he works with. He has already helped more than a handful of local patients with pain and chronic narcotics issues to get off of opioids and to make meaningful changes in their lives!

As Peter notes, “He will be a rock for that hospital and community.”

Who are Your Rockstars?

Physicians form the foundation of our communities around the nation. So, take a moment today to thank a practicing physician for all they do or to encourage a young person to consider a career in medicine.

To see more amazing doctors and why they chose their positions, click here.